Tourism: Latest News

  • Airbnb Aims To Double African Customers This Year

    Airbnb By Reuters, 1:01 am

    Airbnb, a US-based online marketplace to list or rent short-term lodgings, expects to double its customer numbers in Africa this year to 1.5 million. Company CEO Brian Chesky was in Cape Town’s oldest township Friday to surprise graduates from an Airbnb training program. He described Africa as “an incredibly exciting emerging market for travel.” The top five Airbnb cities in Africa are Cape Town, Marrakesh, Johannesburg, Nairobi and Casablanca, although listings are found from St. Helena island in the South Atlantic Ocean to Freetown, Sierra Leone, and Somalia.

  • Entire African Delegation Denied Visas To US-Africa Trade Conference

    us-africa By Staff, 1:01 am

    Visas are routinely denied by U.S. embassies without explanation. With the heightened attention on foreign travelers coming to the U.S., there have been stories of more visas being denied to people from countries not named in the Trump administration’s travel ban executive order. If there has been an increase in the number of visas rejected under the new administration, it’s hard to verify. The State Department data made available to the public ended in late 2016.

  • Downturn Resistant: 5 Countries Topping The African Real Estate Boom

    African real estate boom By Kurt Davis Jr., 11:08 am AFKI Original

    The economic downturn did little to stifle demand for African real estate. Some of the biggest returns and opportunities exist in rental properties, from beachfront getaways to hidden villas. Affordable housing is a major challenge for governments. Private investment is seen as a solution. Developers, private investors, and ordinary people can play a role in addressing the construction gap in the real estate sector and make a good return while doing so.

  • World Bank Paying Ethiopia $68M For Carbon Trading, Green Business Development

    carbon trading By Mongabay, 1:34 pm

    Ethiopia has failed to make the most of emission reduction projects that allow developing countries to sell certified carbon credits, a stakeholder said. Making carbon credits marketable requires time, substantial investment and resources. Even then, a prospective buyer might reject them. Proponents say the carbon trading projects can’t come soon enough. The country is losing five times more forest than it’s planting. If Ethiopia is strategic, it can sell abundant resources like water to help power industrialization, boost tourism, boost electricity generation and create a wealthy green economy. And it’s renewable.

  • Business Etiquette In Angola: 10 Tips For Travelers

    Business etiquette in Angola By Julia Austin, 8:56 am

    Angola, a former Portuguese colony and member of both the African Union and Latin Union, has a diverse business community. Brush up on business etiquette before you go. When meeting someone in Angola, inquire about their family before diving into business. Building relationships is important. Don’t be surprised if business is not even discussed at your first meeting. They just want to get to know you. If there are any government officials present at your meeting, they may be addressed as “Excellency” (male) or “Excelencia” (female), without including their names. “Yes” doesn’t always mean yes. As in other African cultures, agreeing with someone is a sign of respect.

  • VIDEO: An Adventure Through The Okavango Delta In Botswana

    Okavango Delta By Joe Kennedy, 9:54 am

    Each year, floodwaters from Angola flow more than 600 miles and drain into the desert sands of the Kalahari, creating a spectacular wilderness sanctuary along the way. The Okavango Delta is a desert wetland — a contradicition of terms that’s hard to imagine. The variety of flora and fauna means excellent game viewing year round. Excursions — often luxurious and expensive — offer unobtrusive insight to this pristine ecosystem of permanent swamps and seasonally flooded grassland. It’s one of the few large inland delta systems without an outlet to the sea.

  • Great Places To See Public Art In South Africa

    public art in South Africa By Keren Mikva, 8:11 pm

    Art in South Africa’s public spaces often marks the spot where historically significant events took place. Such art pays tribute to South African icons or raises awareness about social issues. There are numerous ongoing public art projects in the country’s cities involving permanent installations and temporary exhibitions. Route 67 in Port Elizabeth is a walking trail that pays tribute to Nelson Mandela’s 67 years of service to South Africans. It includes a collection of 67 art pieces celebrating his devotion to public life. Each piece of art along this heritage trail was designed by a local artist from the Eastern Cape.

  • VIDEO: An Epic Journey In A Canoe Down The Congo River

    canoe down the Congo River By Joe Kennedy, 1:01 am

    Phil Harwood may be the first person to make the source-to-sea trip of the 2,920-mile Congo River in Central Africa in a canoe. You can watch a video of his five-month, mostly solo expedition. He started in northeastern Zambia, and it wasn’t always a smooth ride. While he marveled at the stunning beauty of the waterfalls and swamps he traversed, and encountered great hospitality and kindness, he was also chased, arrested, and he almost collapsed from malaria before finishing the trip.

  • Time Is Running Out For Lemurs. Is Facial Recognition Tech A Last Resort?

    facial recognition tech a last resort for saving lemurs By Mongabay, 3:04 pm

    Lemurs — small primates endemic to Madagascar — are among the most endangered mammals on Earth. A new computer-assisted recognition system — LemurFaceID — can use facial characteristics of lemurs from photos taken in the wild to identify them. The technology could remove many limitations of traditional identification and could do it faster, cheaper and more accurately than other traditional methods, researchers say. It could even help track lemurs taken from their natural habitat by wildlife traffickers.

  • VIDEO: Bouldering In Malawi, Home To The Longest Vertical Rock Wall In Africa

    Bouldering in Malawi By Joe Kennedy, 1:01 am

    Despite knowing almost nothing about Malawi, Mélissa Le Nevé and Benjamin Rueck flew there to do some bouldering. When they arrived, they found a landscape full of massive, untouched rock structures just begging to be climbed. You don’t have to travel far in Malawi to find a cliff or boulder. The landscape is dotted with granite spires. The longest vertical rock wall in Africa is the 5,577-foot Chambe Peak on Mount Mulanje. In this video of their journey shot by Vast Motion Pictures, you can see Nevé and Rueck scale treacherous cliffs, tour local towns and discover why the country is called “the warm heart of Africa.”

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