Tourism: Latest News

  • VIDEO: Bouldering In Malawi, Home To The Longest Vertical Rock Wall In Africa

    Bouldering in Malawi By Joe Kennedy, 1:01 am

    Despite knowing almost nothing about Malawi, Mélissa Le Nevé and Benjamin Rueck flew there to do some bouldering. When they arrived, they found a landscape full of massive, untouched rock structures just begging to be climbed. You don’t have to travel far in Malawi to find a cliff or boulder. The landscape is dotted with granite spires. The longest vertical rock wall in Africa is the 5,577-foot Chambe Peak on Mount Mulanje. In this video of their journey shot by Vast Motion Pictures, you can see Nevé and Rueck scale treacherous cliffs, tour local towns and discover why the country is called “the warm heart of Africa.”

  • A Walk On The Wild Side: Exploring Kruger Park On The Pafuri Trail

    Kruger Park On The Pafuri Trail By clewis, 1:01 am

    After hiking the Pafuri Walking Trail in the remote north of the Kruger Park, I’ve decided the park is best explored on foot. Don’t expect to sleep in at Pafuri Walking Trail Camp. Wake-up call is at 5:30 a.m. Despite guides carrying rifles, I feel vulnerable. A cartoon from Gary Larson’s Far Side pops into my head: Two crocodiles are lying next to each other, a pith helmet and a safari suit between them… A lone elephant is feeding nearby. We tiptoe closer. He swings around and gives us a haughty look. We freeze and hold our breath. Even the birds have gone quiet. Then he saunters away, content that he showed us who is boss.

  • To Meet Aircraft Demand, Boeing Opens Offices In South Africa And Kenya

    Boeing opens offices in South Africa and Kenya By Dana Sanchez, 11:51 am

    One of the world’s largest aircraft manufacturers, U.S.-based Boeing ranked No. 2 among defense contractor in the world in 2016. Boeing Defense does business with countries across Africa in security including surveillance drones. “The aerospace industry needs to start paying closer attention to Africa, because this continent is clearly on the move economically and all the trends are pointing in the right direction for the expansion of the sector,” a Boeing stakeholder said. Boeing hopes its two new African offices will be positioned to meet an anticipated demand of 1,150 new aircraft in Africa by 2035.

  • Subterranean South Africa: 10 Caves Worth Exploring

    caves worth exploring By Becca Blond, 1:01 am

    South Africa has dozens of subterranean treasures. Some of these caves are portals to ancient human life. Visitors can glimpse the inner workings of Earth where the sun don’t shine. Blombos Cave is a coastal archaeological site east of Cape Town famous for 75,000-year-old beads that were found there. They were decorated with abstract designs, making them some of the earliest evidence of human artwork. Excavation of Middle Stone Age sites in Southern Africa resulted in a paradigm shift in understanding the development of modern human behavior.

  • Glamping And Other Travel Buzzwords That Apply To African Tourism

    Buzzwords That Apply To African Tourism By Becca Blond, 8:05 am

    The true history of glamping is up for grabs. In the early 1900s, wealthy American and European travelers demanded luxuries while on safari in Africa. They wanted wild outdoors adventures, but their canvas safari tents usually included beds and a chef to prepare meals. When did this movement become glamping? According to Google Trends, the keyword first started being searched on Google in early 2007. With apologies to the buzzword-averse, here are some tried-and-true travel buzzwords — and some new ones — that apply to travel in Africa.

  • 48 Hours In Windhoek, Namibia

    48 Hours In Windhoek By Dana Sanchez, 1:01 am

    Namibia is one of youngest countries in the world, gaining independence in 1990. Its capital is the place to experience its modern culture and energy. Begin at the Post Street Mall, Windhoek’s main shopping district. There you’ll find a sculpture made from 33 meteorites that dumped 21 tons of mostly ferrous iron rocks some 600 million years ago. The Nama people discovered the meteorites and turned the fragments into weapons and tools. Today, pieces are incorporated in local jewelry designs.

  • The 9 Most Enchanting Islands In Africa

    most enchanting islands in Africa By Julia Austin, 8:02 am

    You can explore miles of sandbars and stunning coral reefs on the postage-stamp-size Medjumbe Island in Mozambique’s Quirimbas archipelago. There is one resort on the island, Anantara Medjumbe, and it has just 12 rooms. It’s a two-minute walk from the island’s private airstrip, which is how you get there — a 45-minute flight from Pemba Airport. The island is 0.62 miles long. Medjumbe Lighthouse was built in the 1930s, worked for three months, then broke down. It has been there ever since and still doesn’t work.

  • The Fighting Bulls Of Western Kenya

    Fighting Bulls of Western Kenya By Frank Mutulu, 8:01 am

    Bullfighting in Kakamega County, Kenya, isn’t like bullfighting in Spain. Instead of matadors fighting bulls, bulls fight each other. Before the fight, the bulls are fed busaa – a local homemade beer – believed to make them feistier. Chanting traditional war songs and poking the air with twigs, the audience watches as a choice bull from one village locks horns with one from another. Despite opposition by animal rights activists, visitors are curious to witness local customs, and there’s growing interest to make bullfighting a tourist attraction here.

  • Video: El Ghriba Festival In Djerba, Tunisia, Historic Home Of Ancient Jews

    El Ghriba Festival By Joe Kennedy, 8:01 am

    Jews who hail from Tunisia travel each year to the island of Djerba in the south to celebrate the holiday of Lag B’Omer, for a 2nd-century rabbi who revealed secrets of kabbalah. The historic home of an ancient Jewish community, Djerba is considered a bastion of religious tolerance in the Middle East. The El Ghriba Festival showcases this. Djerba is one of the only places in the world where Jews can travel from around the world to meet in an Arab country.

  • VIDEO: Kayak Surfing The White Nile In Uganda

    kayak surfing the White Nile in Uganda By Joe Kennedy, 8:01 am

    The hydraulic features of the White Nile are the stuff of legend. The river is huge, flowing 1,000-to-1,600 cubic meters per second. All that water, spilling from the inland sea of Lake Victoria, is warm but refreshing enough to provide relief from the Africa-hot air. Packs of bright-eyed children approach kayakers with the phrase, “jambo mzungu,” which means “hello white person.” The water slides over bedrock shelves, recoiling into waves and holes on a scale better suited for giants. The Nile Special wave is arguably the world’s best big-water surf spot — just one of dozens of play features here.

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