Tag Archives: AFKTravel

AFKTravel: Latest News

  • Business Etiquette In Angola: 10 Tips For Travelers

    Business etiquette in Angola By Julia Austin, 8:56 am

    Angola, a former Portuguese colony and member of both the African Union and Latin Union, has a diverse business community. Brush up on business etiquette before you go. When meeting someone in Angola, inquire about their family before diving into business. Building relationships is important. Don’t be surprised if business is not even discussed at your first meeting. They just want to get to know you. If there are any government officials present at your meeting, they may be addressed as “Excellency” (male) or “Excelencia” (female), without including their names. “Yes” doesn’t always mean yes. As in other African cultures, agreeing with someone is a sign of respect.

  • VIDEO: An Adventure Through The Okavango Delta In Botswana

    Okavango Delta By Joe Kennedy, 9:54 am

    Each year, floodwaters from Angola flow more than 600 miles and drain into the desert sands of the Kalahari, creating a spectacular wilderness sanctuary along the way. The Okavango Delta is a desert wetland — a contradicition of terms that’s hard to imagine. The variety of flora and fauna means excellent game viewing year round. Excursions — often luxurious and expensive — offer unobtrusive insight to this pristine ecosystem of permanent swamps and seasonally flooded grassland. It’s one of the few large inland delta systems without an outlet to the sea.

  • Great Places To See Public Art In South Africa

    public art in South Africa By Keren Mikva, 8:11 pm

    Art in South Africa’s public spaces often marks the spot where historically significant events took place. Such art pays tribute to South African icons or raises awareness about social issues. There are numerous ongoing public art projects in the country’s cities involving permanent installations and temporary exhibitions. Route 67 in Port Elizabeth is a walking trail that pays tribute to Nelson Mandela’s 67 years of service to South Africans. It includes a collection of 67 art pieces celebrating his devotion to public life. Each piece of art along this heritage trail was designed by a local artist from the Eastern Cape.

  • Subterranean South Africa: 10 Caves Worth Exploring

    caves worth exploring By Becca Blond, 1:01 am

    South Africa has dozens of subterranean treasures. Some of these caves are portals to ancient human life. Visitors can glimpse the inner workings of Earth where the sun don’t shine. Blombos Cave is a coastal archaeological site east of Cape Town famous for 75,000-year-old beads that were found there. They were decorated with abstract designs, making them some of the earliest evidence of human artwork. Excavation of Middle Stone Age sites in Southern Africa resulted in a paradigm shift in understanding the development of modern human behavior.

  • Glamping And Other Travel Buzzwords That Apply To African Tourism

    Buzzwords That Apply To African Tourism By Becca Blond, 8:05 am

    The true history of glamping is up for grabs. In the early 1900s, wealthy American and European travelers demanded luxuries while on safari in Africa. They wanted wild outdoors adventures, but their canvas safari tents usually included beds and a chef to prepare meals. When did this movement become glamping? According to Google Trends, the keyword first started being searched on Google in early 2007. With apologies to the buzzword-averse, here are some tried-and-true travel buzzwords — and some new ones — that apply to travel in Africa.

  • 48 Hours In Windhoek, Namibia

    48 Hours In Windhoek By Dana Sanchez, 1:01 am

    Namibia is one of youngest countries in the world, gaining independence in 1990. Its capital is the place to experience its modern culture and energy. Begin at the Post Street Mall, Windhoek’s main shopping district. There you’ll find a sculpture made from 33 meteorites that dumped 21 tons of mostly ferrous iron rocks some 600 million years ago. The Nama people discovered the meteorites and turned the fragments into weapons and tools. Today, pieces are incorporated in local jewelry designs.

  • The 9 Most Enchanting Islands In Africa

    most enchanting islands in Africa By Julia Austin, 8:02 am

    You can explore miles of sandbars and stunning coral reefs on the postage-stamp-size Medjumbe Island in Mozambique’s Quirimbas archipelago. There is one resort on the island, Anantara Medjumbe, and it has just 12 rooms. It’s a two-minute walk from the island’s private airstrip, which is how you get there — a 45-minute flight from Pemba Airport. The island is 0.62 miles long. Medjumbe Lighthouse was built in the 1930s, worked for three months, then broke down. It has been there ever since and still doesn’t work.

  • The Fighting Bulls Of Western Kenya

    Fighting Bulls of Western Kenya By Frank Mutulu, 8:01 am

    Bullfighting in Kakamega County, Kenya, isn’t like bullfighting in Spain. Instead of matadors fighting bulls, bulls fight each other. Before the fight, the bulls are fed busaa – a local homemade beer – believed to make them feistier. Chanting traditional war songs and poking the air with twigs, the audience watches as a choice bull from one village locks horns with one from another. Despite opposition by animal rights activists, visitors are curious to witness local customs, and there’s growing interest to make bullfighting a tourist attraction here.

  • Video: El Ghriba Festival In Djerba, Tunisia, Historic Home Of Ancient Jews

    El Ghriba Festival By Joe Kennedy, 8:01 am

    Jews who hail from Tunisia travel each year to the island of Djerba in the south to celebrate the holiday of Lag B’Omer, for a 2nd-century rabbi who revealed secrets of kabbalah. The historic home of an ancient Jewish community, Djerba is considered a bastion of religious tolerance in the Middle East. The El Ghriba Festival showcases this. Djerba is one of the only places in the world where Jews can travel from around the world to meet in an Arab country.

  • VIDEO: Kayak Surfing The White Nile In Uganda

    kayak surfing the White Nile in Uganda By Joe Kennedy, 8:01 am

    The hydraulic features of the White Nile are the stuff of legend. The river is huge, flowing 1,000-to-1,600 cubic meters per second. All that water, spilling from the inland sea of Lake Victoria, is warm but refreshing enough to provide relief from the Africa-hot air. Packs of bright-eyed children approach kayakers with the phrase, “jambo mzungu,” which means “hello white person.” The water slides over bedrock shelves, recoiling into waves and holes on a scale better suited for giants. The Nile Special wave is arguably the world’s best big-water surf spot — just one of dozens of play features here.

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