Tanzania: Latest News

  • No. 1 Indian Mobile Operator Airtel May Sell Stakes In 15 African Countries

    Airtel may sell stakes in 15 African countries By Dana Sanchez, 10:32 am

    Faced with an escalating price war at home in India, Bharti Airtel is looking to its African operations to reduce debt. India is one of the most competitive telecom markets in the world. The company lost $91 million in Africa in Q3 of 2016. Airtel has 22.14 percent market share in Nigeria and 34.1 million customers. Market observers in Nigeria say lack of access to foreign exchange for operators, falling revenue per user and customers’ lack of disposable income are hurting telecom operators in the country.

  • Global Law Firms Bypass South African Alliances And Set Up Independent Offices For African Expansion

    global law firms bypass South African alliances By Dana Sanchez, 2:20 pm

    When apartheid ended, local law firms had unprecedented growth as SA re-entered the global economy. Leading law firms came calling and formed local alliances. “South African firms had to decide whether they wanted to be South African, African or global,” a stakeholder said. More recently, international firms have bypassed local ones, opening their own offices. SA is a jumping-off point for building networks of offices throughout the continent. Don’t expect the SA influx of international firms to end anytime soon, stakeholders say.

  • How An Economic Union Has Changed African Governance, And What This Means For Zimbabwe

    economic union has changed African governance By Dana Sanchez, 11:09 am

    ECOWAS is credited with persuading Gambian dictator Yahya Jammeh to give up power. If there’s a lesson to be learned, it’s that it takes some external persuasion to remove a dictator. “Forget Trump,” a commentator said. “We in Africa were watching the Gambia and the drama there as African leadership for once, stood up to a tyrant and insisted he respect the outcome of an election.” This regional intervention represents a paradigm shift in African governance, an exiled Zimbabwean judge said. It’s no longer dictatorship as usual in Africa.

  • 20 African Countries With The Most Chinese Migrants, And Why These Statistics Are Problematic

    African countries with the most Chinese migrants By Dana Sanchez, 6:42 pm AFKI Original

    Large numbers of Chinese migrants have followed the money to Africa, but no one really knows how many — not even close. Estimates range from 250,000 to 2 million. Experts say informed guesses are anything from speculative to “very problematic.” It’s a problem because inaccurate claims about the Chinese migrant population can contribute to xenophobic election rhetoric and violence, says a migration researcher. In many countries, statistics on migration are incomplete, out of date or nonexistent. “Statistics are political,” a stakeholder said. The data may be out of date but it’s the only data we’ve got.

  • 12 Ways Africa Will Remember Barack Obama, First Black US President

    12 ways Africa will remember Barack Obama By Dana Sanchez, 1:43 pm AFKI Original

    Barack Obama’s 2008 election as U.S. president inspired millions of Africans with hopes that strong ties to Kenya, country of his father’s birth, would mean increased U.S. involvement. Some believe Obama will leave office Jan. 20, 2017, falling short of those expectations. He has been blamed for not making African issues a top priority of his foreign policy. Others say he leaves a lasting legacy that will live on — especially in Africa’s young leaders.

  • 12 African Heads Of State Who Are On Twitter

    African Heads of State By Peter Pedroncelli, 8:00 am AFKI Original

    African heads of state and politicians make use of social media to communicate with peers and the people which they serve. Twitter is becoming a popular short-message platform in which to connect with the masses, and Donald Trump is not the only world leader that loves to communicate with posts of under 140 characters. From South Africa to Nigeria, the high profile African heads of state tweet, retweet and reply to followers, offering their opinions on many issues while advancing their own agendas through social media. Here are 12 African heads of state who are on Twitter.

  • Morocco Seeks African Union Reinstatement, Settlement Of Unresolved Western Sahara Issue

    Morocco seeks African Union reinstatement By Staff, 3:13 pm

    Morocco’s investment in sub-Saharan Africa the past decade represents 85% of its overall foreign direct investment stocks. The story of its national carrier, Royal Air Maroc, testifies to its expansive economic ambition on the continent. Morocco has expanded economic ties with many African countries through trade and investments since it left the African Union. It now seeks to return to the A.U., boost these ties and settle the unresolved matter of the Western Sahara. It has support of 28 African countries. Leaving the A.U. was a “strategic mistake,” a stakeholder said. “Africa is our natural home.”

  • Zika Confirmed In Angola, Vaccine Now In Its First Phase Of Trials In US

    US Zika vaccine By Dana Sanchez, 5:05 pm

    The Asian strain of Zika responsible for the outbreak in Brazil and the U.S. has not been reported on the African mainland. Cape Verde has reported nine cases of the Asian strain. It’s not known if exposure to the African strain gives protection against the Asian strain. A $54.2 million grant in 2016 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is funding a candidate Zika virus vaccine now in its first phase of trials

  • I Conquered Mount Kilimanjaro And Stood On The Roof Of Africa

    conquered Mount Kilimanjaro By hbarkan, 4:23 am AFKI Original

    I climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in 2012 with my mother and sister. I thought I was ready for the physical challenge. It took us six days to summit, starting in extreme heat. We drank six liters of a water a day to stay hydrated. On the last stretch before the summit, our water froze. We had hot chocolate, but I was unable to take off my gloves to drink it. All the food we had was frozen. The guides tell you repeatedly “pole, pole,” which means “slowly slowly” in Swahili. Once I got to the top I could no longer stand. My legs crumbled and I fell down.

  • 10 More Fantastic Vintage Photos Of Africa

    more fantastic vintage photos of Africa By Karen Elowitt, 12:01 am

    In the 1920s when this photo was taken of a Xhosa man with a pipe, the South African government was busy reinforcing the foundations of apartheid. The government reserved skilled work for whites and denied black workers the right to organize. Legislation in the Natives Urban Areas Act of 1923 entrenched urban segregation and controlled movement by means of pass laws. The hated pass laws were designed to force blacks into labor and to keep them at wage levels that suited white employers.

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