Tanzania: Latest News

  • Morocco Seeks African Union Reinstatement, Settlement Of Unresolved Western Sahara Issue

    Morocco seeks African Union reinstatement By Staff, 3:13 pm

    Morocco’s investment in sub-Saharan Africa the past decade represents 85% of its overall foreign direct investment stocks. The story of its national carrier, Royal Air Maroc, testifies to its expansive economic ambition on the continent. Morocco has expanded economic ties with many African countries through trade and investments since it left the African Union. It now seeks to return to the A.U., boost these ties and settle the unresolved matter of the Western Sahara. It has support of 28 African countries. Leaving the A.U. was a “strategic mistake,” a stakeholder said. “Africa is our natural home.”

  • Zika Confirmed In Angola, Vaccine Now In Its First Phase Of Trials In US

    US Zika vaccine By Dana Sanchez, 5:05 pm

    The Asian strain of Zika responsible for the outbreak in Brazil and the U.S. has not been reported on the African mainland. Cape Verde has reported nine cases of the Asian strain. It’s not known if exposure to the African strain gives protection against the Asian strain. A $54.2 million grant in 2016 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is funding a candidate Zika virus vaccine now in its first phase of trials

  • I Conquered Mount Kilimanjaro And Stood On The Roof Of Africa

    conquered Mount Kilimanjaro By hbarkan, 4:23 am AFKI Original

    I climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in 2012 with my mother and sister. I thought I was ready for the physical challenge. It took us six days to summit, starting in extreme heat. We drank six liters of a water a day to stay hydrated. On the last stretch before the summit, our water froze. We had hot chocolate, but I was unable to take off my gloves to drink it. All the food we had was frozen. The guides tell you repeatedly “pole, pole,” which means “slowly slowly” in Swahili. Once I got to the top I could no longer stand. My legs crumbled and I fell down.

  • 10 More Fantastic Vintage Photos Of Africa

    more fantastic vintage photos of Africa By Karen Elowitt, 12:01 am

    In the 1920s when this photo was taken of a Xhosa man with a pipe, the South African government was busy reinforcing the foundations of apartheid. The government reserved skilled work for whites and denied black workers the right to organize. Legislation in the Natives Urban Areas Act of 1923 entrenched urban segregation and controlled movement by means of pass laws. The hated pass laws were designed to force blacks into labor and to keep them at wage levels that suited white employers.

  • Chinese Ivory Sales Help Fuel World’s 4th Largest Crime Sector

    Chinese ivory sales By Global Risk Insights, 12:51 pm

    Wildlife tourism represents 80% of total annual travel sales to Africa. Environmental crime deprives countries of future revenue. After China announced last week that it plans to end all commerce in ivory by the end of 2017, illegal poaching is back in the spotlight. Corruption remains the key enabler of wildlife trafficking. High-level members of poaching syndicates, sometimes government officials, are rarely convicted. The fight against environmental crime has to be addressed as a political issue. It’s the world’s fourth largest crime sector after drug smuggling, counterfeiting and human trafficking.

  • 5 Things To Expect From African Tech In 2017

    By Tom Jackson, 4:42 am AFKI Original

    Another year, another milestone for the African technology space. With things developing at a rapid pace, it is hard to predict what will be the next big innovation in this exciting sector. Let’s have a go, in any case. Drones seem to have been a topic of discussion for a long time, yet in Africa we haven’t seen much of them. That is probably about to change. The continent is no longer deemed a risky place to do business, but rather digital’s “final frontier”.

  • Mobile Money Services Like M-Pesa Key to Poverty Reduction In Africa

    Mobile Money Revolution By Kevin Mwanza, 6:32 am

    M-Pesa, the world’s largest mobile money network, could be the key to poverty eradication in the developing world based on its success in Kenya where almost 200,000 households headed by women are living above the poverty line as a result of the innovation, according to a study by Journal Science. The service, owned by telecom service provider Safaricom has economically improved the lives of many families in rural parts of East Africa’s biggest economy in the last six years.

  • 5 Major Developments That Shaped Africa’s Tech In 2016

    fintech distributed ledger tech By Tom Jackson, 2:01 am AFKI Original

    Africa is increasingly establishing itself as a hotbed of tech innovation, and 2016 was packed with further progress. From Cairo to Cape Town, from major players to the smallest startups, African tech is developing at a startling pace. But what were the major developments on the tech scene over the course of 2016? Increasingly, investors are seeing Africa as an opportunity rather than a risk, and the tech space in particular is proving itself able to withstand the general slowdown.

  • Most Marketed Ethnic Community In East Africa: Who Are The Maasai?

    who are the Maasai By Frank Mutulu, 7:26 pm

    Other than an acacia tree at sunset, the most common icon of Africa is a Maasai warrior. We’ve all seen the images of tall and slender men draped in red shawls, standing stork-like on one leg and leaning on a spear shaft. Stories of tourists coming to Africa and falling in love with Maasai are now commonplace. They are known to be handsome people. In the evenings, Maasai warriors sometimes gather to dance in rhythm. One by one, they take turns jumping high in the air with spears at their side. The average Maasai warrior leaps up to four feet in the air.

  • East Africa’s Informal Sector Is Growing: Who’s Investing In It, And Why

    East Africa's informal sector By Staff, 6:12 pm

    Where there are challenges or deficits, business and investment opportunities often emerge in the informal sector. The East African informal sector contributes 30-40% of GDP. Operating off the grid (not paying taxes), informal-sector employers and employees run the risk of punishment, limited police protection, and lack of social support services. Consumers help keep the informal sector growing, and it’s not going away anytime soon. Formal companies are getting rich providing services to the millions of consumers who use informal services. Here are some of them.

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