Tanzania: Latest News

  • Opinion: State-Owned African Electricity Monopolies Should Stop Seeing Off-Grid Solar As Competition

    off-grid solar By Staff, 12:02 am

    Manufacturers of off-grid power systems say they can’t keep up with demand in Africa. Many policymakers in Africa see off-grid solar and traditional technologies as competing and fret that off-grid power companies will eat into the customer base of state-owned electricity monopolies. Instead they should encourage the competition. It’s lifting the burden of rural electrification from the state and allowing the state to concentrate investment on improving power supplies for large-scale industrial growth.

  • Sub-Saharan Africa Telecoms Market To Hit $51B By 2021

    By Staff, 4:02 am

    Sub-Saharan Africa’s telecoms service market will be worth $51 billion by 2021, up from $41 billion last year. Mobile services will represent more than 88.4 per cent of the telecoms service revenue in 2021, according to a new report by Analysys Mason, a global specialist adviser in telecoms, media and technology. Retail telecoms revenue in the region will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4.1 per cent during 2015–2021,

  • More Bad News For South Africa: Tomato Leaf Miner Outbreak Reported

    tomato leaf miner By Dana Sanchez, 12:14 am

    A pest that earlier this year devastated the Nigerian tomato crop has been detected for the first time in South Africa after hitching a ride from South America to Europe, then spreading to Asia and Africa, Reuters reported. The tomato leaf miner, aka tuta absoluta, can ruin tomato and potato crops, the South African department of agriculture said on Friday. The outbreak was discovered on a tomato farm in eastern South Africa at a border post with neighboring Mozambique in the Kruger National Park.

  • Upcoming Africa Energy Events Present Opportunities To Network, Exchange Ideas, Seal Deals

    Upcoming Africa Energy Events By Staff, 4:03 pm

    The Africa Energy Forum isn’t happening in Africa but 75 percent of Africa’s energy regulators, utilities bosses and ministers will be there, according to event organizers. The 19th annual conference is scheduled for June 7–9, 2017, in Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants travel from Africa to Europe to meet and do business with power investors from around the world. The goal? To capitalize on the wealth of Scandinavian companies investing in Africa’s power sector.

  • LGBT Tourism: African Muslims Find Inspiration In Cape Town For ‘Compassion-Centered Islam’

    LGBT Tourism By Dana Sanchez, 8:45 pm

    The only country in Africa to allow same-sex marriage, South Africa is considered a haven for LGBT rights. Cape Town is regarded as the gay capital of Africa. It’s full of gay people who have chosen the city as their home, not only for its beauty but because Capetonians are generally liberal and welcoming, SouthAfrica.info says by way of promoting LGBT tourism. This is a form of niche tourism marketed to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender visitors.

  • Changing Trends In Chinese Immigrating To Africa For Business Opportunities

    By Dana Sanchez, 1:24 pm

    These days, Chinese arrivals mostly enter Africa as private citizens seeking business opportunities, not as workers for Chinese infrastructure projects. They’re highly adaptable and one result of the massive influx is new Chinatowsn popping up all over Africa. One example is Cyrildene Chinatown in a formerly predominantly Jewish neighborhood. It quickly displaced a century-old downtown Chinatown to become the most concentrated area of Chinese in Southern Africa.

  • Is Africa Rising or Tilting? The Narrative Is Quickly Changing

    Africa Rising By Kevin Mwanza, 9:42 am

    Ethiopia, the fastest growing economy in sub-Saharan Africa is under a six-month state of emergency as the government tries to restore order after months of Oromia protests that are threatening to undo the economic gains in the country. The horn of Africa nation represents a familiar narrative across Africa where talk of economic developments has come at the expense of social and political oppression.

  • China Pays Africans To Learn Mandarin: It’s All About Business.

    China Pays Africans To Learn Mandarin By Dana Sanchez, 10:06 am

    The Chinese government underwrites much of the Mandarin language education in Africa. Mandarin courses have been introduced this year in more than 40 South African schools with plans to be in 500. The move caused an uproar in South Africa, with parents taking to social media. Proponents say Chinese language skills will help create jobs. South Africa wants to grow tourism between BRICS member countries. Its Department of Tourism has started teaching Mandarin and Russian to tourism frontline staff including tour guides.

  • Could African Agriculture Leapfrog Harmful Pesticides By Using Plant Microbiomes?

    plant microbiomes By Dana Sanchez, 8:48 am

    Microbial solutions for pesticides and fertilizer are revolutionizing Western agriculture, but are slow getting started in Africa. There’s an overwhelming need to improve soil health and crop productivity on the continent. Yields have been stagnant for decades for several staple food crops. The bacteria living in roots, leaves and soil that help plants absorb nutrients, fight disease, and resist drought are less toxic than chemical ones, and potentially more efficient for farmers.

  • Abraaj Group Plans To Transplant Private Health Care In Africa

    By Kevin Mwanza, 8:42 am

    The Abraaj Group, a United Arab Emirates (UAE) based private-equity investment firm, is seeking to invest in Kenya’s growing healthcare market and use it as a launching pad to build a network of hospitals to offer decent and affordable medical services in Africa. The Dubai-based group is in talks to acquire Metropolitan Hospital and other healthcare centers in the capital of East Africa’s biggest economy

More Headlines