Tanzania: Latest News

  • 12 Things That Need To Be Addressed To Help Struggling African Tech Startups

    African Tech Start-Ups By Peter Pedroncelli, 5:40 am AFKI Original

    Africa is the new tech frontier, with a great deal of potential and passion for technology that should translate into the right environment to nurture and grow successful African tech startups, but obstacles and struggles remain. These issues scupper the necessary investment and growth that these startups require so that they can become sustainable and successful on a continental and global scale. We take a look at 12 things that need to be addressed in order to help struggling African tech startups.

  • Two Very Different Responses To Uber: Kenya And South Africa

    African response to Uber By The Conversation, 9:16 am

    Disruptive competition through technology can benefit consumers, but it also raises socioeconomic issues. Africa is no exception. There are concerns that Uber, with its first-mover advantage in the ride-sharing market, is growing into a monopoly despite the benefits to consumers. Traditional metered taxis are seeing red. In South Africa, new entrants into the ride-sharing app market have made little progress. The picture is very different in Kenya. Safaricom appears to have overcome the seemingly insurmountable first-mover position enjoyed by Uber.

  • Mobile Connectivity Is To Africa What Infrastructure Is To The west

    By Staff, 1:01 am

    Accessing utilities in the Western world is relatively straightforward. You have an address, a bank, and a measurable credit rating. Service providers know you have credit in place to pay for the service in advance. However, if you are one of the millions of people across Africa who are unbanked, the process is not nearly as easy. Africans have been forced to find alternative solutions to solve the problem and drive innovation as they do so. By ensuring people have access to credit and services, organisations can open further access to infrastructure.

  • 12 Things You Should Know About How Africans Use Twitter

    Africans use Twitter By Peter Pedroncelli, 2:22 am AFKI Original

    Africans who tweet don’t like to talk about brands nearly as much as their American counterparts. Instead, Africans are increasingly talking politics as Twitter comes of age in Africa, according to a London-based communications firm. Previous research showed that Twitter in Africa was more of a space for social interaction. Now serious debate about politics and government prevails. Twitter continues to be one of the most popular social networks available in Africa, enabled through a heavy mobile usage and apps that cater to smartphone users.

  • 11 African Countries Doing Field Tests For Genetically Modified Crops

    genetically modified crops By Dana Sanchez, 11:52 am AFKI Original

    Africa has been reluctant to adopt GM food technology for crop production, but that’s changing. Many African countries are willing to overcome domestic and international opposition to GM technology to boost their agriculture sector. Just four African countries allow GMO crops for cotton. In Africa, only South Africa grows GM food. Opponents urge African countries not to commercialize GM crops, saying it will put their agricultural sector in the hands of large multinational agri-businesses and hurt biodiversity. Proponents say GM crops are as safe.

  • A First For Africa: Swahili Added To Free US Language App With 150M Users

    Swahili added to free US language app By Staff, 12:52 pm

    The Duolingo app is video-game-like and addictive, according to Time. It was co-developed by Luis Von Ahn, the same Guatemalan-American entrepreneur who founded CAPTCHA — the test used by most website forms to make sure you’re a human, not a computer. It sold to Google in 2009. This allowed von Ahn to pursue his passion project — to improve education so all social classes could have better opportunities. Classes or computer-based language programs like Rosetta Stone cost at least $1,000, he said. “So we decided to do languages for free. We realized that we are teaching almost every European language you can think of, but we had no African languages.”

  • Share Of African Brands Declines In New Survey Of Africa’s 100 Best Brands

    Africa’s 100 Best Brands By Dana Sanchez, 10:53 am AFKI Original

    The annual survey evaluates the top 100 brands in Africa based on consumer responses via mobile text messaging. Results show that non-African brands strengthened their positions in Africa, while African brands’ share among most admired brands dropped from 23 percent to 16 percent. “It is a great concern that the share of African brands is so low and even declining,” said the founder of Brand Africa. “It is a wake-up call for African governments to create enabling environments to support entrepreneurs.”

  • Mobile Money Not As Useful As Expected For Banking Poorer, Rural Africans

    rural Africans Mobile money By Tom Jackson, 2:19 pm AFKI Original

    Just 2% of retail transactions in Africa are electronic. Cash is still king and small transactions — less than $2 — have hindered the growth of mobile money outside of its Kenyan heartland. The value of M-Pesa and similar services is questionable for Africans living on just a few dollars a day. The average M-Pesa transaction value is closer to US$30. It’s unsustainable for agents to serve lower-income segments. They can’t afford to get down to the level of very small transactions, limiting the effect of mobile money on the bottom of the pyramid.

  • The 9 Most Enchanting Islands In Africa

    most enchanting islands in Africa By Julia Austin, 8:02 am

    You can explore miles of sandbars and stunning coral reefs on the postage-stamp-size Medjumbe Island in Mozambique’s Quirimbas archipelago. There is one resort on the island, Anantara Medjumbe, and it has just 12 rooms. It’s a two-minute walk from the island’s private airstrip, which is how you get there — a 45-minute flight from Pemba Airport. The island is 0.62 miles long. Medjumbe Lighthouse was built in the 1930s, worked for three months, then broke down. It has been there ever since and still doesn’t work.

  • Rise Of The African Megacities: What Will It Take To Make Them Smart?

    By Kurt Davis Jr., 1:00 am AFKI Original

    The number of urban Africans almost doubled between 1995 and 2015 and is expected to double again by 2035. Rapid growth is driving the African phenomenon of the megacity — an urban area with a population of at least 10 million. Megacities have economic benefits – economies of scale, innovation, clusters of skilled labor, and higher incomes. But they also struggle with congested slums, unemployment and out-of-control traffic. More than 50 percent of the African urban population lives in slums.

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