South Africa: Latest News

  • Trumponomics: Why African Countries Need To Trade More Among Themselves

    African countries need to trade more among themselves By Staff, 5:32 pm

    Over the last 20 years, Africa’s trade with emerging markets has grown rapidly. A slowdown in global trade could hurt demand for Africa’s export commodities. To counter this, African economies must boost intraregional trade. While unlikely to compensate for a global trade slowdown, this might mitigate some of its more negative effects. Faced with the threat of new disruptions to existing trade patterns, it’s important that African economies start trading more among themselves.

  • 9 Things To Expect In African Real Estate Markets In 2017

    African real estate markets By Dana Sanchez, 2:22 pm AFKI Original

    Shopping is changing in Africa. Formal retail developers are learning from the failures of malls in developed markets like the U.S., and applying new models to old ideas. African micro enterprises and small businesses will have a greater demand for shared space and flexible office space in the future. New or existing African office developments will need to apply design principles used in innovation labs, incubation centers and flexible work spaces, a stakeholder said.

  • South Africans No. 1 In The World For Watching Porn On Mobile Devices

    By Dana Sanchez, 11:06 pm

    In 2016, South Africa was the top country in the world for greatest proportion of consumers using mobile devices to watch porn, according to data from Pornhub, the world’s largest porn portal. For the first time, South Africa made the list of top 20 countries for porn-watching traffic. That means South Africa is ahead of the rest of the continent. The jump can be attributed to an increase in Internet access and porn viewing by black people, according to News24.

  • Do Wildebeest Hunt In Packs? Wildlife Guide Talks About Human And Animal Behavior On Safari

    human and animal behavior on safari By Karen Elowitt, 5:09 pm

    Wildlife photography is all about being able to read animal behavior, says James Suter, a photo and video safari guide based in Cape Town. “We often chuckle at what clients say,” he told he told AFKTravel. Like “’Do wildebeest hunt in packs?” African wildlife guides are careful to not criticize humans unaccustomed to the wild. “Everyone who goes on safari wants to see a kill, then the most gruesome kill occurs in front of them and half the vehicle is in tears or wants to leave. Or we’ll come around a corner and see lions, and the guests will cower and hide.”

  • How A US Firm Hopes To Keep Tantalum In Africa A Little Longer Before It Ends Up In Your Cell Phone

    tantalum in Africa By Dana Sanchez, 12:02 am

    If you own a mobile phone, chances are it has tantalum in it from Africa and you have small amounts of the rare metal within inches of your brain. U.S.-based AB Minerals claims to have invented a new disruptive tantalite processing technology that it says will enable tantalum-producing countries to add value to the ore themselves rather than exporting raw ore to China. The company hopes to sell this technology all over Africa. The first African plant is expected to begin operating in Rwanda in 2017. Here’s part of an interview with AB Minerals founder and CEO Frank Balestra.

  • 10 More Fantastic Vintage Photos Of Africa

    more fantastic vintage photos of Africa By Karen Elowitt, 12:01 am

    In the 1920s when this photo was taken of a Xhosa man with a pipe, the South African government was busy reinforcing the foundations of apartheid. The government reserved skilled work for whites and denied black workers the right to organize. Legislation in the Natives Urban Areas Act of 1923 entrenched urban segregation and controlled movement by means of pass laws. The hated pass laws were designed to force blacks into labor and to keep them at wage levels that suited white employers.

  • African Consumers In The Spotlight At Consumer Electronics Show 2017 In Las Vegas

    Consumer Electronics Show 2017 in Las Vegas By Dana Sanchez, 2:41 pm

    Sweden-based Ericsson is at the show, predicting that 5G will dominate mobile subscriptions in Africa by 2022. It’s one of several companies trying to connect the dots between the latest technology innovations and their dependence on infrastructure. Thermal cameras that help protect African elephants from poachers are on display there, backed by Google and the World Wildlife Fund. And The Swazi Bridge Project is there — a tech company using white space bandwidth to deliver high-speed internet to people in Swaziland.

  • New Year’s Resolution: Investing In African Healthcare And Fitness

    investing in African healthcare By Kurt Davis Jr., 7:57 am AFKI Original

    In cities from Victoria Island in Lagos, Nigeria to Maputo, Mozambique, gym memberships can be above $100 per month. Africans are paying higher fees than in more mature markets. Zumba classes are abundant, yoga is everywhere, and biking and running are an ever-growing trend in Africa. Putting cash into the facilities for these types of activities is lucrative. Scalability is still a concern but branding across borders and within regions is necessary for growth.

  • 12 Things Expected To Improve Investor Outlook In South Africa In 2017

    By Peter Pedroncelli, 1:25 am AFKI Original

    The year 2016 was not an easy one for South Africa, but investor outlook for the year 2017 certainly looks more positive. Having survived a tough year, investors are now looking at South Africa to gauge whether or not to invest their funds in the emerging market, but there are a flurry of reasons to give the country a second glance in 2017. We take a look 12 things that are expected to improve investor outlook in South Africa during 2017.

  • Chinese Ivory Sales Help Fuel World’s 4th Largest Crime Sector

    Chinese ivory sales By Global Risk Insights, 12:51 pm

    Wildlife tourism represents 80% of total annual travel sales to Africa. Environmental crime deprives countries of future revenue. After China announced last week that it plans to end all commerce in ivory by the end of 2017, illegal poaching is back in the spotlight. Corruption remains the key enabler of wildlife trafficking. High-level members of poaching syndicates, sometimes government officials, are rarely convicted. The fight against environmental crime has to be addressed as a political issue. It’s the world’s fourth largest crime sector after drug smuggling, counterfeiting and human trafficking.

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