Rwanda: Latest News

  • 15 Photos Of Rwanda That Will Make Your Jaw Drop

    photos of Rwanda that will make your jaw drop By Derek Dias, 7:00 am

    One of the smallest African countries, Rwanda has a dark past. Genocide 22 years ago claimed the lives of nearly 1 million people. Foreign aid, strong leadership and a national resolve for unity and progress helped transform Rwanda into one of the most forward-looking countries in Africa. It is clean, safe and increasingly modern. President Paul Kagame’s vision is for the country to qualify for middle-income status by 2020. See for yourself. Check out these 15 photos and start dreaming about how you’ll make it to Rwanda.

  • D Is For Drones. Drones Are For Development In Africa

    By Tom Jackson, 4:20 am AFKI Original

    Drones are, without doubt, one of the next big things of Africa’s tech revolution. Slowly but surely, they are being introduced in innovative ways to help with the continent’s development. In an interesting move, the City of Cape Town last week announced a partnership with local tech firm WeFix to use drones to spot sharks at Fish Hoek and Muizenberg beaches.

  • Rwandan Genocide Survivor Builds A Media Empire Empowering Youth

    Rwandan genocide survivor By Ann Brown, 8:12 am AFKI Original

    A survivor of the Rwandan genocide, entrepreneur Marcel Mutsindashyaka chose to use the media, not for revenge, but for peace building. His Rwandan media and IT company has helped restore unity in the country by engaging youth. It is now the second most popular news website in Rwanda. Mutsindashyaka was chosen to be in Obama’s Young African Leaders Initiative. The experience “opened my mind from local to global perspective,” he told AFKInsider. “From this I realized that there is potential for the U.S. and Africa to collaborate for mutual benefit.”

  • South Africa Flip-Flops, Breaks Ranks To Vote For UN’s First-Ever LGBT Expert

    first-ever UN LGBT expert By Dana Sanchez, 11:32 am

    South Africa was criticised in June by human rights groups and praised this week when it changed its mind about appointing the first-ever U.N. expert tasked with investigating LGBT rights abuses worldwide. In a turnaround that broke ranks with other African countries, South Africa approved the legality of the post and voted against delaying it. South Africa was one of the few African countries that did not support delaying the appointment. Several countries said Monday that they would not recognize or cooperate with the U.N.

  • Planting Trees In Africa: Is That The Solution To The Continent’s Land Management Crises?

    Land Management Crises By Dana Sanchez, 2:40 pm

    Ethiopia is hardly the only recent example of how conflicts over land rights can set the stage for political and humanitarian crises. Competition for arable land contributed to the Rwandan genocide in 1994. Food insecurity stemming from land mismanagement is an important factor driving migrants to Europe. Farmers have always intuitively known what scientists are now confirming: trees and other vegetation can stimulate more rainfall.

  • Language Barriers Hurt African Investments. Can Tech Innovation Help Solve The Problem?

    Language barriers hurt African investments By Dana Sanchez, 3:32 pm

    Language is a barrier to investment in Africa, but economists say African innovators should think beyond English when developing innovations aimed at solving local problems. There are more than 3,000 languages spoken in Africa by some counts. Language barriers — especially an inability to communicate in English — have hampered trade in Mozambique, where Portuguese is spoken by more than half the population, and Rwanda, where Kinyarwanda is spoken by most Rwandans, but English is an official language.

  • Africa’s Biggest Lender Commits $2B To China This Year

    Africa's biggest lender By Dana Sanchez, 11:12 am

    Africa’s largest lender, Johannesburg-based Standard Bank this year made $2 billion in loan commitments to Chinese-owned development projects in Africa, and it plans to help Chinese entrepreneurs seek African investment opportunities in areas such as retail. Access to credit remains a challenge for many Africans. Standard Bank says its opportunities lie in working “on the yuan’s internationalization and helping Chinese companies transform from … contractors to investors.”

  • Opinion: State-Owned African Electricity Monopolies Should Stop Seeing Off-Grid Solar As Competition

    off-grid solar By Staff, 12:02 am

    Manufacturers of off-grid power systems say they can’t keep up with demand in Africa. Many policymakers in Africa see off-grid solar and traditional technologies as competing and fret that off-grid power companies will eat into the customer base of state-owned electricity monopolies. Instead they should encourage the competition. It’s lifting the burden of rural electrification from the state and allowing the state to concentrate investment on improving power supplies for large-scale industrial growth.

  • Is Marriott’s African Expansion More Significant Than Airbnb’s?

    By Dana Sanchez, 12:42 pm

    While there is plenty of information available online about Airbnb’s growth in South Africa, not much is available on its progress throughout the rest of the continent. We know that Airbnb has 25,000 listings in South Africa, and more than half are in Cape Town. Marriott, meanwhile, is on track to have 205 hotels and 37,000 rooms in all of Africa after its six new African hotels are built. Three of the six new Marriott properties will be in Cape Town.

  • 13 Things You Didn’t Know About Katwe, Uganda

    Africa International Film Festival By Dana Sanchez, 5:04 pm AFKI Original

    Most people outside Africa were introduced to Katwe, Uganda’s biggest slum, by way of a newly released Disney movie, “Queen of Katwe,” about a local chess prodigy. Katwe is described as one of the worst places on earth. It’s also known as a hive of ingenuity; its artisans, craftsmen and technicians famous for repairing imported electronic devices and cars. They’re also known for their ability to improvise and manufacture imitations of original items. Nearly half of all teenage girls in Katwe are mothers.

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