Rwanda: Latest News

  • Planting Trees In Africa: Is That The Solution To The Continent’s Land Management Crises?

    Land Management Crises By Dana Sanchez, 2:40 pm

    Ethiopia is hardly the only recent example of how conflicts over land rights can set the stage for political and humanitarian crises. Competition for arable land contributed to the Rwandan genocide in 1994. Food insecurity stemming from land mismanagement is an important factor driving migrants to Europe. Farmers have always intuitively known what scientists are now confirming: trees and other vegetation can stimulate more rainfall.

  • Language Barriers Hurt African Investments. Can Tech Innovation Help Solve The Problem?

    Language barriers hurt African investments By Dana Sanchez, 3:32 pm

    Language is a barrier to investment in Africa, but economists say African innovators should think beyond English when developing innovations aimed at solving local problems. There are more than 3,000 languages spoken in Africa by some counts. Language barriers — especially an inability to communicate in English — have hampered trade in Mozambique, where Portuguese is spoken by more than half the population, and Rwanda, where Kinyarwanda is spoken by most Rwandans, but English is an official language.

  • Africa’s Biggest Lender Commits $2B To China This Year

    Africa's biggest lender By Dana Sanchez, 11:12 am

    Africa’s largest lender, Johannesburg-based Standard Bank this year made $2 billion in loan commitments to Chinese-owned development projects in Africa, and it plans to help Chinese entrepreneurs seek African investment opportunities in areas such as retail. Access to credit remains a challenge for many Africans. Standard Bank says its opportunities lie in working “on the yuan’s internationalization and helping Chinese companies transform from … contractors to investors.”

  • Opinion: State-Owned African Electricity Monopolies Should Stop Seeing Off-Grid Solar As Competition

    off-grid solar By Staff, 12:02 am

    Manufacturers of off-grid power systems say they can’t keep up with demand in Africa. Many policymakers in Africa see off-grid solar and traditional technologies as competing and fret that off-grid power companies will eat into the customer base of state-owned electricity monopolies. Instead they should encourage the competition. It’s lifting the burden of rural electrification from the state and allowing the state to concentrate investment on improving power supplies for large-scale industrial growth.

  • Is Marriott’s African Expansion More Significant Than Airbnb’s?

    By Dana Sanchez, 12:42 pm

    While there is plenty of information available online about Airbnb’s growth in South Africa, not much is available on its progress throughout the rest of the continent. We know that Airbnb has 25,000 listings in South Africa, and more than half are in Cape Town. Marriott, meanwhile, is on track to have 205 hotels and 37,000 rooms in all of Africa after its six new African hotels are built. Three of the six new Marriott properties will be in Cape Town.

  • 13 Things You Didn’t Know About Katwe, Uganda

    Africa International Film Festival By Dana Sanchez, 5:04 pm AFKI Original

    Most people outside Africa were introduced to Katwe, Uganda’s biggest slum, by way of a newly released Disney movie, “Queen of Katwe,” about a local chess prodigy. Katwe is described as one of the worst places on earth. It’s also known as a hive of ingenuity; its artisans, craftsmen and technicians famous for repairing imported electronic devices and cars. They’re also known for their ability to improvise and manufacture imitations of original items. Nearly half of all teenage girls in Katwe are mothers.

  • African Milestone: Rwanda Launches National Drone Delivery. Public Perception? They’re Weapons

    Rwanda launches national drone delivery By Dana Sanchez, 11:22 am

    The Silicon Valley based Zipline team tested its drone delivery system for months in Rwanda to make sure it worked prior to launch, usually with an audience of locals. “Every day, we have hundreds of Rwandans lining up along the fence of the distribution center to watch operations,” said Zipline’s CEO. “The whole crowd cheers for every single takeoff and landing throughout the day. Some people show up at 6 a.m. to get good seats.” Some aid workers say drones have a bad reputation in Africa. People think they’re weapons.

  • The Future Of AGOA With Trans-Pacific Partnership Rising

    future of AGOA with Trans-Pacific Partnership By Kurt Davis Jr., 9:53 am AFKI Original

    Critics argue the Trans-Pacific Partnership will cancel out trade benefits that many African countries have under the African Growth and Opportunity Act. Others say TPP is the newer, better AGOA. The next trade agreement between the sub-Saharan African countries and the U.S. as well as Europe should be a better version of TPP. Intra-Africa regional trade still accounts for just 25% of total exports in sub-Sahara. By comparison, European and Asian intra-regional exports are at 70% and 50%. Sub-Sahara still has a way to go.

  • Aviation Pioneer Rwanda Expands Airline Fleet While Others Cut Back

    Rwanda expands airline fleet By Dana Sanchez, 3:18 pm

    Rwanda, with the world’s first drone port under construction, also has a new international airport planned and recently took possession of its first wide body aircraft — an investment expected to open up new markets. RwandAir has its eye on the U.S., Europe and Asia, with 25 targeted destinations by 2018. The 7-year-old airline has yet to turn a profit, but the government plans to build a new airport to accommodate four times more passengers than Kigali can handle.

  • Mo Ibrahim Says Governance Good In Small African Countries, Big Ones Not So Much

    Mo Ibrahim By Dana Sanchez, 6:28 pm

    Ibrahim got rich on telecommunications, but he has invested millions in good governance. “Power corrupts absolutely,” Ibrahim said. He called for more international outrage over stolen elections. “People are learning how to steal elections because that looks less brutal than saying ‘I’m president for life,'” he said. “There is a limit to how long they can go on stealing elections. More and more of these elections are being subject to the harsh light of … social media.”

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