Nigeria: Latest News

  • Leading Pan-African Infrastructure Financier Issues $150M Maiden Sukuk

    sukuk By Dana Sanchez, 11:22 am

    Islamic finance is in its early stages in Africa but the potential is getting huge attention from financiers on the continent, due in part to the demographic realities of Africa. Muslims account for 40 percent or more of the population in nearly half the countries in Africa. Africa’s infrastructure deficit needs around $90 billion in investment each year for the next 10 years, according to consulting firm EY. Sukuk could be an affordable way for African governments to fill the gap.

  • Guide To Calabar, Nigeria, Sanctuary City For Endangered African Drill Monkeys

    Guide to Calabar By Staff, 8:02 am

    Once a center of the slave trade, the ancient port of Calabar is now one of the prettiest cities in Nigeria. It has long sought to position itself as a tourist center and jumping-off point for exploring Cross River State, home to Nigeria’ s only population of drill monkeys. Drills are one of Africa’s most endangered mammals. You can see them at Pandrillus in Calabar, the world’s most successful drill monkey breeding program. Director Peter Jenkins is a hero to some and hated by others. He’s been the target of death threats for trying to change local attitudes against catching monkeys for bush meat.

  • Expect More African Reverse Innovations: 4 Top Players In African Tech, On What They Know For Sure

    Expect more African reverse innovations By Tom Jackson, 9:51 am AFKI Original

    In 2017, expect more African reverse innovations that address local challenges and have global applications. Expect more drones. More Africans connected to the internet. Expect the calls for faster, cheaper internet to grow louder in 2017. Four key players in the African tech space talked to AFKInsider about what they know for sure and what they’re looking forward to in 2017: BRCK co-founder Erik Hersman, project Isizwe founder Alan Knott-Craig, Jumia co-CEO Jeremy Hodara and Ovum analyst Danson Njue.

  • How An Economic Union Has Changed African Governance, And What This Means For Zimbabwe

    economic union has changed African governance By Dana Sanchez, 11:09 am

    ECOWAS is credited with persuading Gambian dictator Yahya Jammeh to give up power. If there’s a lesson to be learned, it’s that it takes some external persuasion to remove a dictator. “Forget Trump,” a commentator said. “We in Africa were watching the Gambia and the drama there as African leadership for once, stood up to a tyrant and insisted he respect the outcome of an election.” This regional intervention represents a paradigm shift in African governance, an exiled Zimbabwean judge said. It’s no longer dictatorship as usual in Africa.

  • French-African Fund Targets Startups, Claims To Be First ‘Cross-Border’ Fund

    French African fund By Staff, 1:00 am

    An investment fund that describes itself as “the first cross-border fund between Africa and France” wants to help French companies expand in Africa and African companies expand into France and other E.U. markets. Investments will be in the form of equity participation, generally through minority stakes. The fund’s capital will targeted towards African startups displaying a high growth potential. Investors include Orange, Bpifrance, Société Générale and Proparco.

  • Nigeria Losing Out As Real Estate Capital Flows Shift From Sub-Saharan Africa To Europe

    Real Estate Capital Flows Shift From Sub-Saharan By Staff, 12:17 pm

    Nigeria should be witnessing major investment into its commercial property industry, given its large economy relative to the rest of the continent, its population, which is more than 184 million people and its general development potential. Yet its reliance on oil and its volatile currency had hindered investment. South African investment groups invested in Eastern Europe at the expense of opportunities closer to home, to the tune of around $1.5 billion in 2016. This was more than the total investment volumes recorded in Kenya, Nigeria and Ghana for the past five years or so.

  • 20 African Countries With The Most Chinese Migrants, And Why These Statistics Are Problematic

    African countries with the most Chinese migrants By Dana Sanchez, 6:42 pm AFKI Original

    Large numbers of Chinese migrants have followed the money to Africa, but no one really knows how many — not even close. Estimates range from 250,000 to 2 million. Experts say informed guesses are anything from speculative to “very problematic.” It’s a problem because inaccurate claims about the Chinese migrant population can contribute to xenophobic election rhetoric and violence, says a migration researcher. In many countries, statistics on migration are incomplete, out of date or nonexistent. “Statistics are political,” a stakeholder said. The data may be out of date but it’s the only data we’ve got.

  • Gambian Tourism Faces 50% Revenue Loss From Political Uncertainty

    Gambian tourism By Dana Sanchez, 1:15 pm

    Tourism has been the fastest-growing sector of The Gambia’s economy until now, accounting for 18-to-20% of the country’s revenue. The country, population about 2 million, is marketed to vacationers as “the smiling coast of West Africa.” In the wake of the current political unrest, tourism revenue will likely fall 50%, a stakeholder said. The sector will have to rebuilt just as it was after the 1994 coup that brought longtime ruler Yahya Jammeh to power. “I feel sorry for everybody here,” an evacuating Brit said. “It’s going to take years for tourism to pick up again.”

  • Nigerian Internet Sensation Uses Fame To Give A Voice To African Artists

    African artists By Ann Brown, 9:41 am AFKI Original

    Graduating from art school with honors is no guarantee you’ll make it as an artist in Africa or anywhere else. Nigerian painter Oresegun Olumide beat the odds, amazing the world with oil paintings so realistic, they look like photos. Using the people of his Lagos community as subjects, his social media posts go viral. He wants African governments to provide more structure for showcasing African arts heritage to the world. Nigerian society doesn’t accept art and artists well, he said. It is not a priority. “Artists can bring to life the history of Africa through painting. We can tell Africa’s story but we need funding to do so.”

  • 12 African Heads Of State Who Are On Twitter

    African Heads of State By Peter Pedroncelli, 8:00 am AFKI Original

    African heads of state and politicians make use of social media to communicate with peers and the people which they serve. Twitter is becoming a popular short-message platform in which to connect with the masses, and Donald Trump is not the only world leader that loves to communicate with posts of under 140 characters. From South Africa to Nigeria, the high profile African heads of state tweet, retweet and reply to followers, offering their opinions on many issues while advancing their own agendas through social media. Here are 12 African heads of state who are on Twitter.

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