Namibia: Latest News

  • Should US Exports To Africa Be Duty free? Opinion: Trump Will End Unilateral Trade

    By Staff, 3:53 pm

    Recently renewed by U.S. President Barack Obama, the African Growth and Opportunity Act, or AGOA, allows qualifying African countries to export certain products to the U.S. duty free. U.S. exports to Africa, however, are subject to customs duties. Incoming President Donald Trump isn’t going to go for that, says Herman Cohen, a former U.S. ambassador to several African countries. “I have the feeling that he will ask African governments to accept reciprocity in trade relations,” Cohen said.

  • How A US Firm Hopes To Keep Tantalum In Africa A Little Longer Before It Ends Up In Your Cell Phone

    tantalum in Africa By Dana Sanchez, 12:02 am

    If you own a mobile phone, chances are it has tantalum in it from Africa and you have small amounts of the rare metal within inches of your brain. U.S.-based AB Minerals claims to have invented a new disruptive tantalite processing technology that it says will enable tantalum-producing countries to add value to the ore themselves rather than exporting raw ore to China. The company hopes to sell this technology all over Africa. The first African plant is expected to begin operating in Rwanda in 2017. Here’s part of an interview with AB Minerals founder and CEO Frank Balestra.

  • African Consumers In The Spotlight At Consumer Electronics Show 2017 In Las Vegas

    Consumer Electronics Show 2017 in Las Vegas By Dana Sanchez, 2:41 pm

    Sweden-based Ericsson is at the show, predicting that 5G will dominate mobile subscriptions in Africa by 2022. It’s one of several companies trying to connect the dots between the latest technology innovations and their dependence on infrastructure. Thermal cameras that help protect African elephants from poachers are on display there, backed by Google and the World Wildlife Fund. And The Swazi Bridge Project is there — a tech company using white space bandwidth to deliver high-speed internet to people in Swaziland.

  • New Year’s Resolution: Investing In African Healthcare And Fitness

    investing in African healthcare By Kurt Davis Jr., 7:57 am AFKI Original

    In cities from Victoria Island in Lagos, Nigeria to Maputo, Mozambique, gym memberships can be above $100 per month. Africans are paying higher fees than in more mature markets. Zumba classes are abundant, yoga is everywhere, and biking and running are an ever-growing trend in Africa. Putting cash into the facilities for these types of activities is lucrative. Scalability is still a concern but branding across borders and within regions is necessary for growth.

  • Halal Economy: South Africa Among Top 5 Global Producers Of Halal Products

    halal products By Dana Sanchez, 4:10 pm

    Around 60% of all products in South African stores are halal certified. Despite Muslims forming 1.5% percent of the population, this huge percentage of halal products is due to the large quantity of exports sent north in the continent, much of which is Muslim. South African traders make up about half of Africa’s fast-moving consumer goods sector, and 35 percent of these traders are Muslim. SA has helped other African countries set up halal certification including Zambia, Namibia, Botswana and Mozambique.

  • Decision Could Come Within Weeks On Chevron South Africa Assets Sale

    Chevron South Africa assets sale By Dana Sanchez, 11:28 am

    Chevron South Africa assets include a refinery in Cape Town that produces 110,000 barrels a day, a lubricants plant in Durban and about 800 Caltex service stations. It’s one of South Africa’s top five petroleum brands and has done business in the country for more than 100 years. Low oil prices and uncertainty about future prices will make it difficult for potential buyers to fund an acquisition themselves or to raise capital externally, a stakeholder said.

  • Shining The Light On Religious Freedom In Africa: Countries That Celebrate Diversity

    religious freedom in Africa By Andrew Friedman, 5:44 pm AFKI Original

    Sierra Leone takes religious tolerance seriously. Not only are relations cordial between the two main religious groups in the West African country, but it is not unusual here to be both Christian and Muslim. Thousands of Sierra Leoneans are known as ChrisMus. “I see it as the same religion,” one of the faithful said, sporting a Jesus bracelet. “All of us say it’s the same god that we’re worshiping.” Overall, the country ranks as “partly free” for human rights compliance.

  • 15 Wet And Wild Outdoors Activities To Do In Africa

    wet and wild outdoors activities to do in Africa By Dana Sanchez, 7:00 am

    You need a visa to visit Eritrea, and another permit to go to Eritrea’s Dahlak Archipelago, a chain of 124 small islands and two larger ones in the Red Sea near Massawa. Off the beaten path doesn’t begin to describe it. You can expect pristine beaches and unparalleled marine life with few other tourists for miles. Dahlak’s pearl fisheries have been famous since ancient times. Charter yachts can be hired for scuba diving and pearl fishing. During years of war, fishery came to a halt in the area. The unexpected result of isolation? There are lots of fish and they aren’t shy.

  • An Investment Banker’s 54 Wishes For African Economies In 2017

    54 Wishes For African Economies in 2017 By Kurt Davis Jr., 4:29 pm AFKI Original

    A sense of what Zimbabwe can expect post-Mugabe. Partnership in the fight against terror for Tunisia. Better strategies combating poverty and HIV in Swaziland. These are just a few of the wishes that a U.S. investment banker visualizes for African countries as the old year winds down and 2016 gives way to 2017.

  • Castro’s Mixed Legacy In Africa: He Fought Colonialism, Found Capitalism Repugnant

    Fidel Castro By Dana Sanchez, 5:24 pm

    Fidel Castro was no angel. He ran Cuba with “a strong arm and dodgy economic policies,” but for many in Africa, the Cuban leader was a friend in need. Castro is credited with helping pit Russia against the U.S. in a war in Angola that brought about the beginning of the end of apartheid. It wasn’t just about independence from colonialists but also from the perceived injustices of capitalism. “I find capitalism repugnant. It is filthy, it is gross, it is alienating,” Castro said.

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