Kenya: Latest News

  • I Conquered Mount Kilimanjaro And Stood On The Roof Of Africa

    conquered Mount Kilimanjaro By hbarkan, 4:23 am AFKI Original

    I climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in 2012 with my mother and sister. I thought I was ready for the physical challenge. It took us six days to summit, starting in extreme heat. We drank six liters of a water a day to stay hydrated. On the last stretch before the summit, our water froze. We had hot chocolate, but I was unable to take off my gloves to drink it. All the food we had was frozen. The guides tell you repeatedly “pole, pole,” which means “slowly slowly” in Swahili. Once I got to the top I could no longer stand. My legs crumbled and I fell down.

  • Opinion: Targeting Ivory Poachers With Drone Strikes Could Salvage Obama’s African Legacy

    Targeting ivory poachers with drone By Staff, 1:01 am

    Obama should instruct the U.S. State Department to designate ivory poachers for what they are: Terrorist financiers and facilitators of ISIS- and al-Qaeda-affiliated groups in sub-Saharan Africa. Make the life expectancy of poachers so short that no one will risk taking the job. And that requires a few well-placed military drone strikes on poaching camps from any number of our established drone bases in Djibouti, Niger, Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Burkina Faso or the Seychelles.

  • 10 More Fantastic Vintage Photos Of Africa

    more fantastic vintage photos of Africa By Karen Elowitt, 12:01 am

    In the 1920s when this photo was taken of a Xhosa man with a pipe, the South African government was busy reinforcing the foundations of apartheid. The government reserved skilled work for whites and denied black workers the right to organize. Legislation in the Natives Urban Areas Act of 1923 entrenched urban segregation and controlled movement by means of pass laws. The hated pass laws were designed to force blacks into labor and to keep them at wage levels that suited white employers.

  • African Consumers In The Spotlight At Consumer Electronics Show 2017 In Las Vegas

    Consumer Electronics Show 2017 in Las Vegas By Dana Sanchez, 2:41 pm

    Sweden-based Ericsson is at the show, predicting that 5G will dominate mobile subscriptions in Africa by 2022. It’s one of several companies trying to connect the dots between the latest technology innovations and their dependence on infrastructure. Thermal cameras that help protect African elephants from poachers are on display there, backed by Google and the World Wildlife Fund. And The Swazi Bridge Project is there — a tech company using white space bandwidth to deliver high-speed internet to people in Swaziland.

  • Ethiopian Space Race: Plans To Produce Satellites, Launch Rockets Locally

    Ethiopian space race By Dana Sanchez, 10:57 am

    A scholarly tradition tied to agriculture, stargazing in Ethiopia predates Christianity. Some historians argue that the first study of celestial bodies can be traced back to Ethiopia. Ethiopia’s space ambitions could make it the first country in the Horn of Africa and Northeast Africa to become a space power. Developing satellites and rocket launchers locally in Ethiopia could prompt Kenya, Uganda, Egypt and even Sudan to accelerate their own space ambitions.

  • Chinese Ivory Sales Help Fuel World’s 4th Largest Crime Sector

    Chinese ivory sales By Global Risk Insights, 12:51 pm

    Wildlife tourism represents 80% of total annual travel sales to Africa. Environmental crime deprives countries of future revenue. After China announced last week that it plans to end all commerce in ivory by the end of 2017, illegal poaching is back in the spotlight. Corruption remains the key enabler of wildlife trafficking. High-level members of poaching syndicates, sometimes government officials, are rarely convicted. The fight against environmental crime has to be addressed as a political issue. It’s the world’s fourth largest crime sector after drug smuggling, counterfeiting and human trafficking.

  • 5 Things To Expect From African Tech In 2017

    By Tom Jackson, 4:42 am AFKI Original

    Another year, another milestone for the African technology space. With things developing at a rapid pace, it is hard to predict what will be the next big innovation in this exciting sector. Let’s have a go, in any case. Drones seem to have been a topic of discussion for a long time, yet in Africa we haven’t seen much of them. That is probably about to change. The continent is no longer deemed a risky place to do business, but rather digital’s “final frontier”.

  • Halal Economy: South Africa Among Top 5 Global Producers Of Halal Products

    halal products By Dana Sanchez, 4:10 pm

    Around 60% of all products in South African stores are halal certified. Despite Muslims forming 1.5% percent of the population, this huge percentage of halal products is due to the large quantity of exports sent north in the continent, much of which is Muslim. South African traders make up about half of Africa’s fast-moving consumer goods sector, and 35 percent of these traders are Muslim. SA has helped other African countries set up halal certification including Zambia, Namibia, Botswana and Mozambique.

  • Uber, Airbnb Are Most Valuable US Tech Startups Doing Business In Africa

    most valuable US tech startups doing business in Africa By Dana Sanchez, 1:45 pm

    In the process of tapping into the sharing economy, Airbnb tapped into a relatively unfilled niche in Africa — the need for reliable, mid-range accommodation in African cities. Doing so helped Airbnb become the second most valuable U.S. startup in 2016. Valued at $68 billion, Uber is the most valuable startup in the U.S. and across the globe — proof that you can get rich by sharing.

  • Mobile Money Services Like M-Pesa Key to Poverty Reduction In Africa

    Mobile Money Revolution By Kevin Mwanza, 6:32 am

    M-Pesa, the world’s largest mobile money network, could be the key to poverty eradication in the developing world based on its success in Kenya where almost 200,000 households headed by women are living above the poverty line as a result of the innovation, according to a study by Journal Science. The service, owned by telecom service provider Safaricom has economically improved the lives of many families in rural parts of East Africa’s biggest economy in the last six years.

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