African Ph.D. researchers
Taskeen Adam and Richmond Juvenile Ehwi are part of a Cambridge University Ph.D. program to help train world-class researchers for Africa. Photo: Nick Saffell/cam.ac.uk

Opinion: World Needs 1M New African Ph.D. Researchers To Help Solve Global Challenges

By Dana Sanchez, 1:02 pm

It’s not just Africa that needs research and researchers for its own use. The world needs African researchers — 1 million of them in the next 10 years — and a leading U.K. university hopes to help bridge the gap. The world needs the unique knowledge and perspective that African researchers can provide to solve shared global challenges, says David Dunne, director of the Cambridge-Africa Programme. “We can’t have a situation where 14% of the world’s population — living on a continent with unique culture, diversity and environment — contributes less than 1% of published research output.”

Entrepreneurship: Latest News

  • Importing African Innovation To Silicon Valley: 5 DEMO Africa Startups Compete On Their Own Terms

    By Dana Sanchez, 11:27 am

    Five winning African tech startups are in Silicon Valley competing with others from around the world and hopefully attracting venture capital. A lot of them are self-taught and lack formal training in venture creation and digital entrepreneurship, an event manager said. “They have built companies on binary codes and learned new skills through the mobile internet. If a Silicon Valley technology event is live streamed across the world, there are African entrepreneurs huddled somewhere, watching it and consuming every panel, consuming every fireside chat, taking notes, and then applying those notes to their local context.”

  • 12 Things You Should Know About South Africa’s 2017 Budget Speech

    2017 budget speech By Peter Pedroncelli, 7:40 am AFKI Original

    The rich will pay more tax. That’s one of the most riveting things to come out of South African Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s 2017 budget speech. Income tax increases across the board did not materialise, but wealthy South Africans will be taxed at a higher bracket. Taxpayers earning more than $115,000 a year will pay a 45% tax rate. Around 100,000 taxpayers will be affected. Investors and global credit agencies were keen to hear Gordhan’s speech — his second one in his second stint as finance minister. Here is a closer look at 12 things you should know about the 2016 South African budget speech.

  • 23 African Countries With The Lowest Unemployment Rates

    African countries lowest unemployment By Dana Sanchez, 2:43 pm AFKI Original

    South Africa is invariably cited in discussions about jobless rates in Africa, but two thirds of African countries have higher unemployment. Africa is witnessing its best growth performance in decades, yet the world’s youngest continent, demographically speaking, continues to have high unemployment with few signs of recovery in 2017. High unemployment is a key factor shaping young people’s decisions to migrate. The continent’s youth population is expected to double to 830 million by 2050.

  • Getting Real: Government About To Publish Guidelines For Medical Marijuana South Africa

    By Dana Sanchez, 2:37 pm

    Marijuana is illegal in South Africa, but the country is a step closer to legalizing it for medicinal purposes. The South African government plans to soon publish proposed guidelines for production of cannabis, known locally as dagga. “This is a major breakthrough and fantastic news for freedom of choice,” said Narend Singh, MP for the Inkatha Freedom Party. The hemp industry is interested in legalizing the strain of cannabis used for hemp. SA imports $76 million worth of hemp products a year, Singh said. There’s also a case due to be heard in the Constitutional Court calling for full legalization including for recreational use.

  • Nigerian Firm Plans Luxury E-Commerce Platform For The Ultra Rich

    Nigerian firm plans luxury E-commerce platform By Dana Sanchez, 1:01 am

    Local Nigerian appetites for luxury appear to be intact, despite the country’s financial hardship since crude oil prices fell off a cliff. Trendy hotspots are constantly appearing. There are rumors of a Nobu restaurant under construction. When wealthy Nigerians want a shopping spree without the airfare to London, some go to Polo Luxury, which operates luxury retail outlets across West Africa. Jennifer Obayuwana is executive director of the company founded by her father. She spoke to Forbes about the planned March launch of Polo’s luxury online shopping platform – a first of its kind in Africa.

  • The Market For African Beach Sand: Who’s Buying, Selling And Mining It?

    By Dana Sanchez, 5:34 pm

    With its island-building binge, Dubai is a big customer for African sand. So are Africa’s expanding concrete manufacturing giants. For the island project “The Palm Jumeirah,” Dubai used 200 million cubic meters of sand and stone. Some of the sand came from the sea off Dubai’s coast but a large amount came from African beaches. In Cape Verde, one in three people is unemployed. Sand mining is a fast way to earn money. The consequences of excessive sand mining are devastating. On beaches where tortoises once buried their eggs, there is now only dirt and stones.

  • Swedish Furniture Giant Ikea Plans An All-African Collection In 2019

    Ikea Plans An All-African Collection By Dana Sanchez, 4:16 pm

    The world’s largest furniture and homeware store, Ikea, has collaborated with some of the best designers in seven sub-Sahran African countries to curate its first African collection in what is described as an effort to “democratize design.” Ikea says it wants to tap into the “creative explosion” happening across the continent. The furniture and homeware collection will focus on “modern rituals and the importance they play in the home.” The collection probably won’t be accessible in the African cities that inspired it. Ikea’s only African outlets are in Morocco and Egypt.

  • The Lights Are Still On In Nigerian E-Commerce Space

    Nigerian e-commerce By Tom Jackson, 12:35 pm AFKI Original

    Despite the hype, profitability is still an unattainable ideal for Nigerian online shopping giants Konga and Jumia. Believers say e-commerce in Africa is “absolutely a long-term play.” They expect the short- and medium-term to be challenging. Players are still working on fast and easy payments and refunds, and trouble-free deliveries and returns. “It takes a long time for consumers to become comfortable shopping online, and it’s hard and expensive to accelerate this,” a stakeholder said. Investors aren’t all put off though. The potential prizes are too great.

  • Trevor Noah Awarded By NAACP. Will His Book, “Born A Crime,” Become Required Reading?

    Trevor Noah awarded by NAACP By Dana Sanchez, 3:39 pm

    Some U.S. journalism professors have been encouraged to incorporate Trevor Noah’s new book, “Born A Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood,” into their classwork. A comedian and host of Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show,” Noah is still finding his voice, one commentator said. He lacks the tenacity, defiance and indignation that made his predecessor, Jon Stewart such a stalwart. But time will treat him well. If cable TV fails Noah, “literature will remain a firm ally.” Noah’s debut book has been described as “extraordinarily heartfelt, compulsively enriching (and) a hell of a memoir.”

  • 17 Things You Didn’t Know Were Invented By South Africans

    By Keren Mikva, 1:11 pm AFKI Original

    In the developing world, many water-fetchers — often women and children — do the back-breaking work of lugging water buckets over their heads or by hand. The Hippo Water Roller won the 1997 South Africa Design for Development Award. The 90-liter drums can carry 90 kilograms (198.4 pounds) of water and can be pushed or pulled across rough terrain. Check out these 17 things used across the globe that were invented by South Africans.

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