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World Bank Boosts African Startups With Business Acceleration Initiative

By Peter Pedroncelli, 5:36 am

The World Bank Group has committed to supporting the growth of Africa’s digital economy with the launch of XL Africa, a business acceleration initiative that will provide a raft of benefits for the 20 most promising startups in sub-Saharan Africa over the next five months. African digital entrepreneurs will have an opportunity to be mentored by various global specialists, increase their visibility on the continent and receive access to corporate partners and investors.

Business: Latest News

  • South Africa Hosts Trials For Mastercard’s First Fingerprint Credit Card

    Mastercard's first fingerprint credit card By Dana Sanchez, 9:40 pm

    Mastercard hopes to roll out fingerprint payment cards globally by the end of 2017. South Africans’ willingness to try new technology and their familiarity with using biometrics for identification made the country an ideal market to test the payment cards. They’ll work with any card terminal around the world that accepts embedded chip technology. In the U.S., embedded chips are increasingly popular. Regulations make merchants and financial institutions liable for breaches resulting from a lack of support for chip-and-pin cards. Some merchants won’t have to get new equipment to accept fingerprint-enabled cards.

  • Want To Invest Outside South Africa? JSE Launches First Africa-Focused ETF

    JSE Launches First Africa-Focused ETF By Dana Sanchez, 4:53 pm

    An IPO today on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange introduced a new option for investors who want to add African exposure to their portfolios. The AMI Big 50 ex-SA ETF offers 50 African blue-chip companies outside South Africa. The IPO is a world first – an ETF offering exposure to a pan-African index that excludes South Africa. “A lot of people do worry about the liquidity risk, but being an ETF means that there is a secondary market on the JSE which allows investors in smaller quantities to trade exposure in and out of Africa,” a stakeholder said. The ETF is managed by Cloud Atlas, which plans to launch two more Africa-focused ETFs by July.

  • Opinion: Big Bond For Africa Could Help Maximize Aid At A Time When Aid Is Under Pressure

    Big Bond for Africa By Staff, 2:57 pm

    At a time when aid is under political pressure, a bold approach is needed to maximize the efficiency of donor resources. While governments in Africa are spending more on public infrastructure themselves, outside finance is still required, especially for regional projects — rarely a priority for national governments. Aid from Africa’s traditionally generous foreign donors is set to shrink. There may be a solution. The “Big Bond” is a strategy for leveraging foreign aid funds in international capital markets to generate financing for massive infrastructure investment.

  • 12 Sub-Saharan African Countries With The Best Access To Electricity

    Access to electricity in Africa By Peter Pedroncelli, 3:25 am AFKI Original

    Many of us take access to electricity for granted, but only two out of every five people in Africa have decent access to energy to power lights and other electrical appliances throughout the day. Around 625 million people in Sub-Saharan Africa have no access to electricity, according to the International Energy Agency. We take a look at 12 Sub-Saharan African countries with the best access to electricity.

  • Under-The-Radar African Pension Funds Could Help Pay For Infrastructure

    African pension funds By Staff, 8:36 pm

    Pension funds are good news for infrastructure projects in Africa. Development banks and private equity funds are targeting pension funds in Africa as sources of investment capital. Four African countries hold 90 percent of Africa’s pension fund assets. Despite challenges, African pension funds are likely to make a substantial impact on infrastructure investment in the next few years. One promising trend is the rise of regional funds targeting pensions. They’re making a new source of African capital available to address the region’s infrastructure deficit.

  • AGOA: Just 1 Reason Why China Loves Manufacturing In Ethiopia

    why China loves manufacturing in Ethiopia By Staff, 1:00 am

    By moving manufacturing to Ethiopia, Chinese textile companies are moving closer to their raw material base, the cotton-producing countries. This is part of their value chain repositioning, a strategy most Chinese companies are adopting. They’re are also using Africa as a gateway to emerging markets on and off the continent. Products made in Ethiopia can be exported duty- and quota free to the U.S. under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). The same benefits apply to the E.U. Ethiopia also offers cheap electricity at US$0.04 cents per kilowatt hour. It’s now the second-largest electricity producer in sub-Sahara due to its hydropower dams.

  • 2016 Was A Bad Year For Private Equity In Africa. Commodities Prices Could Turn That Around

    bad year for private equity in Africa By Staff, 12:01 am

    The fall in African private equity investment in 2016 could be a short-term blip. Among the losers was US-based Carlyle, one of the world’s winningest investment firms. Carlyle invested $147m in Nigeria’s Diamond Bank in 2014. The bank’s market cap fell by 90% over the subsequent two years. Bob Geldof’s PE firm 8 Miles just invested in Blue Skies, a British fruit firm that operates in Africa. Utilities including telecoms were the most popular target for private equity investment in 2016. West Africa was the most active region.

  • Opinion: Getting Africa’s Energy Transformation Right Will Involve Policies, Investments That Boost Diversity

    Africa's energy transformation By Staff, 1:00 am

    Africa has an opportunity to pioneer the next investment frontier. Rather than treating new climate-related risks as hurdles to overcome, African policymakers should view them as opportunities for investment and innovation. To accelerate a market shift on the scale that Africa needs will require increased financing from export credit agencies, development banks, commercial financial institutions, and other cross-border sources.

  • Tapping Into Local Tradition: How AB InBev Hopes To Crack Africa’s Home-Brew Market

    InBev hopes to crack Africa's home-brew market By Reuters, 1:00 am

    Africa’s informal alcohol market is about four times bigger than its $11 billion commercial market, analysts say. Home brews have a strong tradition rooted in centuries-old African rituals. AB InBev needs to develop products affordable enough to tap the informal beer and alcohol markets, says InBev’s new Africa head. AB Inbev’s big rivals in Africa – Heineken and Diageo – have also launched lower-priced drinks made with local ingredients that are affordable for more people.

  • South Africa’s Big 12 Retailers Shift From Expansion To Tech Investment

    shift from expansion to tech investment By Staff, 11:08 am

    Data from the big 12 retailers in South Africa show that they are putting their money into store refurbishments and IT instead of African expansion. Compare this to five years ago. The picture was very different. There was talk of aggressive store rollouts. Some South African companies have expanded into Europe and the U.K. to diversify earnings, but when the rand strengthened, those companies lost out. The customer focus is grounded in technology for the Big 12. IT is playing a critical role in investing in customers — building online capability, enhancing efficiency across supply chains and distribution, and reward programs to enhance client insights.

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