lusophone Africa
Small-scale traditional fishing boats in Maputo. Photo: Cordelia Persen/Flickr

Why China Needs Mozambique To Be A Star In Portuguese-Speaking Africa

By Dana Sanchez, 2:13 pm

After oil prices crashed, Angola could no longer service its US$25 billion debt to China. Since the loans were supposed to be paid in oil, most of Angola’s crude production now goes to debt repayment, leaving little to finance economic development. Spending has decreased by 40 percent and cuts to water sanitation and waste collection helped put Angola sixth-to-last on World Bank’s index of inequality. Unlike Angola, Mozambique’s foreign debt and accompanying economic problems cannot be traced back to Chinese loans. Instead they are the result of Chinese illegal fishing in its waters.

Business: Latest News

  • Expect More African Reverse Innovations: 4 Top Players In African Tech, On What They Know For Sure

    Expect more African reverse innovations By Tom Jackson, 9:51 am AFKI Original

    In 2017, expect more African reverse innovations that address local challenges and have global applications. Expect more drones. More Africans connected to the internet. Expect the calls for faster, cheaper internet to grow louder in 2017. Four key players in the African tech space talked to AFKInsider about what they know for sure and what they’re looking forward to in 2017: BRCK co-founder Erik Hersman, project Isizwe founder Alan Knott-Craig, Jumia co-CEO Jeremy Hodara and Ovum analyst Danson Njue.

  • Home Prices Up Almost 12 Percent In Cape Town, Above Average In Durban, PE

    South African home prices By Staff, 5:31 pm

    In KwaZulu-Natal the strongest activity is along the North Coast from Durban to Ballito — popular among investors. Residential development in upscale areas such as uMhlanga and Sibaya is enormous, prompting converns of oversupply, but home prices are expected to increase. Durban’s North and South Beach areas, including The Point, have increased as popular residential areas, thanks in part to the general upgrade to the Promenade.

  • How An Economic Union Has Changed African Governance, And What This Means For Zimbabwe

    economic union has changed African governance By Dana Sanchez, 11:09 am

    ECOWAS is credited with persuading Gambian dictator Yahya Jammeh to give up power. If there’s a lesson to be learned, it’s that it takes some external persuasion to remove a dictator. “Forget Trump,” a commentator said. “We in Africa were watching the Gambia and the drama there as African leadership for once, stood up to a tyrant and insisted he respect the outcome of an election.” This regional intervention represents a paradigm shift in African governance, an exiled Zimbabwean judge said. It’s no longer dictatorship as usual in Africa.

  • French-African Fund Targets Startups, Claims To Be First ‘Cross-Border’ Fund

    French African fund By Staff, 1:00 am

    An investment fund that describes itself as “the first cross-border fund between Africa and France” wants to help French companies expand in Africa and African companies expand into France and other E.U. markets. Investments will be in the form of equity participation, generally through minority stakes. The fund’s capital will targeted towards African startups displaying a high growth potential. Investors include Orange, Bpifrance, Société Générale and Proparco.

  • Power Africa Partner, Nobel Prize Nominee Breaks Ground On Solar Power Plant In Burundi

    Power Africa By Dana Sanchez, 4:55 pm

    In Burundi, where just 5% of people have electricity, a new 7.5-megawatt solar power plant is under construction. It’s expected to add 15% power generation capacity to the East African country. The groundbreaking was held Thursday in Mubuga. The solar plant will be built on 42 acres, 65 miles from the capital of Bujumbura. Mubuga has never had electricity and is 6.8 miles away from the power grid. Its residents have depended on candles, lanterns, firewood and charcoal since time immemorial.

  • Is Sibanye Gold Heading For The Door Or Just Reducing Exposure In South Africa?

    Sibanye Gold By Staff, 2:46 pm

    Exclusively a South African gold producer until September 2015, JSE-listed Sibanye Gold is set to become the world’s fourth-biggest platinum and third-largest palladium producer. Sibanye hopes to acquire Montana-based Stillwater Mining for $2.2 billion. If completed, the acquisition will further dilute Sibanye’s portfolio. Sibanye began its expansion in 2016 with the purchase of platinum mines in Southern Africa. The Stillwater deal is in a whole other league. It’s much more valuable and involves mines far from Sibanye’s home country.

  • Nigeria Losing Out As Real Estate Capital Flows Shift From Sub-Saharan Africa To Europe

    Real Estate Capital Flows Shift From Sub-Saharan By Staff, 12:17 pm

    Nigeria should be witnessing major investment into its commercial property industry, given its large economy relative to the rest of the continent, its population, which is more than 184 million people and its general development potential. Yet its reliance on oil and its volatile currency had hindered investment. South African investment groups invested in Eastern Europe at the expense of opportunities closer to home, to the tune of around $1.5 billion in 2016. This was more than the total investment volumes recorded in Kenya, Nigeria and Ghana for the past five years or so.

  • 20 African Countries With The Most Chinese Migrants, And Why These Statistics Are Problematic

    African countries with the most Chinese migrants By Dana Sanchez, 6:42 pm AFKI Original

    Large numbers of Chinese migrants have followed the money to Africa, but no one really knows how many — not even close. Estimates range from 250,000 to 2 million. Experts say informed guesses are anything from speculative to “very problematic.” It’s a problem because inaccurate claims about the Chinese migrant population can contribute to xenophobic election rhetoric and violence, says a migration researcher. In many countries, statistics on migration are incomplete, out of date or nonexistent. “Statistics are political,” a stakeholder said. The data may be out of date but it’s the only data we’ve got.

  • Gambian Tourism Faces 50% Revenue Loss From Political Uncertainty

    Gambian tourism By Dana Sanchez, 1:15 pm

    Tourism has been the fastest-growing sector of The Gambia’s economy until now, accounting for 18-to-20% of the country’s revenue. The country, population about 2 million, is marketed to vacationers as “the smiling coast of West Africa.” In the wake of the current political unrest, tourism revenue will likely fall 50%, a stakeholder said. The sector will have to rebuilt just as it was after the 1994 coup that brought longtime ruler Yahya Jammeh to power. “I feel sorry for everybody here,” an evacuating Brit said. “It’s going to take years for tourism to pick up again.”

  • Nigerian Internet Sensation Uses Fame To Give A Voice To African Artists

    African artists By Ann Brown, 9:41 am AFKI Original

    Graduating from art school with honors is no guarantee you’ll make it as an artist in Africa or anywhere else. Nigerian painter Oresegun Olumide beat the odds, amazing the world with oil paintings so realistic, they look like photos. Using the people of his Lagos community as subjects, his social media posts go viral. He wants African governments to provide more structure for showcasing African arts heritage to the world. Nigerian society doesn’t accept art and artists well, he said. It is not a priority. “Artists can bring to life the history of Africa through painting. We can tell Africa’s story but we need funding to do so.”

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