Tom Jackson

  • Mobile Money Not As Useful As Expected For Banking Poorer, Rural Africans

    rural Africans Mobile money By Tom Jackson, 2:19 pm AFKI Original

    Just 2% of retail transactions in Africa are electronic. Cash is still king and small transactions — less than $2 — have hindered the growth of mobile money outside of its Kenyan heartland. The value of M-Pesa and similar services is questionable for Africans living on just a few dollars a day. The average M-Pesa transaction value is closer to US$30. It’s unsustainable for agents to serve lower-income segments. They can’t afford to get down to the level of very small transactions, limiting the effect of mobile money on the bottom of the pyramid.

  • The Lights Are Still On In Nigerian E-Commerce Space

    Nigerian e-commerce By Tom Jackson, 12:35 pm AFKI Original

    Despite the hype, profitability is still an unattainable ideal for Nigerian online shopping giants Konga and Jumia. Believers say e-commerce in Africa is “absolutely a long-term play.” They expect the short- and medium-term to be challenging. Players are still working on fast and easy payments and refunds, and trouble-free deliveries and returns. “It takes a long time for consumers to become comfortable shopping online, and it’s hard and expensive to accelerate this,” a stakeholder said. Investors aren’t all put off though. The potential prizes are too great.

  • Why African Education Is Ripe For A Digital Revolution

    African education is ripe for a digital revolution By Tom Jackson, 11:29 am AFKI Original

    From digital educational materials for school children to the Uberisation of tutoring, tech is finding new ways of improving access to quality learning in Africa. But it isn’t happening fast enough for some people. Data is expensive, and many areas still have little or no connectivity. African governments have spent a lot of money to enable e-learning, but have not yet seen the results. Still, it’s an attractive sector to investors. Africa’s e-learning market doubled in size from 2011 to 2016.

  • Africans Don’t Trust Elections. Here’s How Tech Could Help

    Africans don’t trust elections By Tom Jackson, 7:55 am AFKI Original

    As tech becomes more widespread in Africa, democratic processes will become more accessible. Internet and mobile technologies can reach remote areas and give voice to many. Rashaad Alli is a manager at South African nonprofit People’s Assembly, which supports websites that make parliamentary information more accessible to ordinary people. “Access to information is a great enabler to effect social change and deepen democracy,” Alli said. “Tech tools help increase transparency, expose corruption, strengthen democracy and hold governments to account.”

  • Help Wanted: 1000s Of Unfilled Software Jobs On A Continent Plagued By Unemployment

    unfilled software jobs in Africa By Tom Jackson, 10:02 am AFKI Original

    Africa is outsourcing great tech jobs to skilled workers on other continents. There are tens of thousands of unfilled software jobs on a continent plagued by unemployment, especially among its digitally savvy youth. Digital skills training is vital to Africa’s future, says the co-founder of CodeX, one of many companies in Africa trying to address the shorfall. Many of the continent’s challenges can be solved with tech solutions, but ultimately they must be solved by the people who understand the problems intimately – Africans themselves. Help is on the way. Here are some of the companies offering skills training in Africa.

  • Expect More African Reverse Innovations: 4 Top Players In African Tech, On What They Know For Sure

    Expect more African reverse innovations By Tom Jackson, 9:51 am AFKI Original

    In 2017, expect more African reverse innovations that address local challenges and have global applications. Expect more drones. More Africans connected to the internet. Expect the calls for faster, cheaper internet to grow louder in 2017. Four key players in the African tech space talked to AFKInsider about what they know for sure and what they’re looking forward to in 2017: BRCK co-founder Erik Hersman, project Isizwe founder Alan Knott-Craig, Jumia co-CEO Jeremy Hodara and Ovum analyst Danson Njue.

  • 5 Things To Expect From African Tech In 2017

    By Tom Jackson, 4:42 am AFKI Original

    Another year, another milestone for the African technology space. With things developing at a rapid pace, it is hard to predict what will be the next big innovation in this exciting sector. Let’s have a go, in any case. Drones seem to have been a topic of discussion for a long time, yet in Africa we haven’t seen much of them. That is probably about to change. The continent is no longer deemed a risky place to do business, but rather digital’s “final frontier”.

  • 5 Major Developments That Shaped Africa’s Tech In 2016

    fintech distributed ledger tech By Tom Jackson, 2:01 am AFKI Original

    Africa is increasingly establishing itself as a hotbed of tech innovation, and 2016 was packed with further progress. From Cairo to Cape Town, from major players to the smallest startups, African tech is developing at a startling pace. But what were the major developments on the tech scene over the course of 2016? Increasingly, investors are seeing Africa as an opportunity rather than a risk, and the tech space in particular is proving itself able to withstand the general slowdown.

  • D Is For Drones. Drones Are For Development In Africa

    By Tom Jackson, 4:20 am AFKI Original

    Drones are, without doubt, one of the next big things of Africa’s tech revolution. Slowly but surely, they are being introduced in innovative ways to help with the continent’s development. In an interesting move, the City of Cape Town last week announced a partnership with local tech firm WeFix to use drones to spot sharks at Fish Hoek and Muizenberg beaches.

  • Why African Cities Are Striving To Be Tech Hubs

    By Tom Jackson, 4:20 am AFKI Original

    The majority of African cities are striving to be tech hubs. From Cairo to Accra, Lagos to Nairobi, Cape Town to Johannesburg, cities are striving to emulate Silicon Valley as tech hubs. Nairobi’s iHub launched with government support, and the Enterprise Kenya initiative is designed to assist local startups. In Lagos, the presidency has offered backing to tech startups, and there are a myriad of hubs.