Kurt Davis Jr.

  • African Financial Services In 2017: Buying Low For The Upside

    African financial services By Kurt Davis Jr., 5:03 pm AFKI Original

    The story line in 2017 is buy undervalued assets, especially those with massive upside — no surprise. The surprise, however, may be looking for that opportunity in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Kabila is still in power despite his term of office ending. Mineral prices have been low and hurt local mining companies. Budget cuts are a big topic in local politics. The DRC, like one or two other countries on this list, is worrisome on the surface. But there are opportunities in the government’s desire to strengthen private-sector investment.

  • Private Equity Is Not Dead, But Maybe It’s Time For More Hedge Funds In Africa

    Hedge Funds In Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 2:00 am AFKI Original

    Short-term volatility and uncertainty in the African growth story create opportunities for hedge funds. Hedge funds generally operate more flexibly than private equity, and they have the creativity to generate bond-like returns that outpace inflation. Critics say hedge funds have limited liquidity in an opaque world. The riskiest play — but with big returns — is in agriculture and land. Where land is for sale in Africa, investors are making a play for a limited resource, especially when it’s arable, ripe for production or ideal for commercial and residential construction.

  • East Africa Is The Manufacturing Star In Sub-Saharan Africa In 2017

    manufacturing star in sub-Saharan Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 9:54 am AFKI Original

    As commodity prices have fallen, African manufacturing has increased leverage — and the attention of investors — to garner more foreign investment. Tanzania is probably one of the easier bets if you are following the crowd. Success stories include Kenya-based Catalyst Principal Partners, an East Africa-focused private equity firm which invested in Zenufa Laboratories, a leading Tanzanian pharmaceuticals manufacturer. Catalyst also invested in Chemi Cotex, which makes toothpaste, skin and hair products. Both involve non-food and beverage consumer goods that are manufactured locally. Both have taken market share due to quality products and competitive pricing.

  • Low Asset Prices Present Investment Opportunities In Lusophone Africa

    investment opportunities in Lusophone Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 2:33 pm AFKI Original

    Investors are strategically betting on the upside in Francophone Africa due to strong economic growth rates and a stable CFA franc. Lusophone Africa also presents opportunity. Low assets prices have replaced the exorbitant numbers of the oil-and-gas heyday, particularly in Angola and Mozambique. Debt restructuring can restore some confidence in Mozambique’s economic system. Private investors are finding a government more willing to deal on better terms, and companies that are pricing assets at fairly digestible prices.

  • The Anglos Are Coming To Francophone Africa With An Appetite For Investment

    Anglos investing in Francophone Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 10:13 am AFKI Original

    The Anglos have an apparently insatiable investment appetite for the region. Gabon will no longer fly under the radar after Washington, D.C.-based Carlyle Group — the world’s largest private equity fund — purchased Royal Dutch Shell’s onshore assets in Gabon for $587 million. Petroleum services, infrastructure and timber are rising on the radar for crafty investors in Gabon. Financial services and ICT too. Gabon is a stable provider of services and networks to neighboring countries. Here are six other Francophone African countries investors are looking at.

  • Wealth Opportunity Walks On 4 Legs In Africa: Top Countries For Livestock Investment

    top countries for livestock investment in Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 5:44 pm AFKI Original

    Africans are demanding more meat in their diets, but consumption may be limited because there are not enough commercial livestock owners producing affordable food. Firms are gobbling up arable land, not just for crop production but also for livestock and cattle. Investment shops are slowly redirecting capital to this subsector of agriculture. Nigeria is in tough times, but people still have to eat. About 45% of rural households own livestock, and meat consumption is strongly correlated to livestock ownership in Nigeria. Fewer than 10 percent of livestock owners function as a business. Most are just supporting the household livelihood.

  • Downturn Resistant: 5 Countries Topping The African Real Estate Boom

    African real estate boom By Kurt Davis Jr., 11:08 am AFKI Original

    The economic downturn did little to stifle demand for African real estate. Some of the biggest returns and opportunities exist in rental properties, from beachfront getaways to hidden villas. Affordable housing is a major challenge for governments. Private investment is seen as a solution. Developers, private investors, and ordinary people can play a role in addressing the construction gap in the real estate sector and make a good return while doing so.

  • Low Corporate Tax Rate Beckons Investors To Under-The-Radar Mauritania

    low corporate tax rate Mauritania By Kurt Davis Jr., 10:24 am AFKI Original

    Mauritania requires no royalty payments, which is not the norm. This is a benefit for oil, gas and mining explorers anxious about paying royalties when commodity prices are unpredictable. Mauritania’s corporate income tax rate is relatively low at 25% — a plus in a region where the tax and fiscal systems can change any investor’s outlook on risk and reward. Large government irrigation projects have aided agricultural production in the desert. Israeli technology and cropping strategies have had some success in other parts of Africa. There is potential here, but it requires investment in technology — not always a priority in agriculture.

  • One Of The Biggest Misconceptions About Equatorial Guinea: No Infrastructure

    misconceptions about Equatorial Guinea By Kurt Davis Jr., 10:34 pm AFKI Original

    Equatorial Guinea is not the easiest place to get to, or the easiest place to understand. Sub-Saharan Africa’s third-largest oil producer is aggressively spending oil revenue on building roads, schools, hospitals and housing. First-time visitors to this closed, mysterious country will encounter easily navigated highways. The government is constructing Oyala, a planned city deep in the rainforest, to possibly replace Malabo as the capital. Oyala will feature new government buildings, a university, five-star hotels and conference centers. Kempinski, one of Europe’s oldest luxury hotel groups, plans to operate the first Oyala hotel and golf resort.

  • Rise Of The African Megacities: What Will It Take To Make Them Smart?

    By Kurt Davis Jr., 1:00 am AFKI Original

    The number of urban Africans almost doubled between 1995 and 2015 and is expected to double again by 2035. Rapid growth is driving the African phenomenon of the megacity — an urban area with a population of at least 10 million. Megacities have economic benefits – economies of scale, innovation, clusters of skilled labor, and higher incomes. But they also struggle with congested slums, unemployment and out-of-control traffic. More than 50 percent of the African urban population lives in slums.