Agriculture: Latest News

  • Africa Needs To Make A Mooooove On Its $400 Billion Dairy Market

    dairy market By Staff, 12:01 am

    Milk consumption in Africa is the lowest in the world. The continent has more than 10 percent of the world’s cattle, but contributes less than 3 percent to global milk production. African countries import more than $500 million worth of milk a year from Europe and North America. Ghana’s dairy industry has been plagued with challenges including lack of modern technology. Most dairy farmers milk cattle the traditional way, and don’t know where to market their product.

  • Why Some African Countries Are Banning Donkey Exports To China

    donkey exports to China By Staff, 4:09 am

    African Donkeys have something Chinese consumers want — so much so that the balance of trade in this new industry is getting out of sync. Africa is kicking back. China, a world leader in donkey imports, needs an estimated 4 million donkeys annually to achieve a massive 5,000-tonne production goal of making a traditional Chinese medicine known as ejiao. Currently, China can supply around 1.8 million donkeys. “The scale of the demand from China is often so large that it can rapidly overwhelm the supply of any single resource,” a stakeholder said.

  • Nigeria’s Economic Survival Depends On Agric, Manufacturing Sector – Buhari

    By Staff, 3:20 am

    As the nation grapples with severe economic crisis, President Muhammadu Buhari has said that its survival was dependent on the agricultural and manufacturing sector. Buhari stated this at the 44th Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (MAN) held at Transcorp Hilton hotel, Abuja on Thursday. He lauded the association over the theme of the conference “Diversifying the Nigerian Economy: the Role of Government in Manufacturing”

  • M&A Africa: Pending Global Seed Monopolies Could Threaten Small-Scale African Farmers

    Pending global seed monopolies By Dana Sanchez, 11:12 am

    In Africa, proposed consolidations of seed and agrochemicals industries will result in a bigger push for genetically modified technology. For sub-Sahara’s predominantly small-scale farmers already operating at a low profit margin, greater consolidation means less choice for them and consumers. These proposed mergers are not just about seeds and pesticides. They’re about controlling big data, DNA and intellectual property, stakeholders say.

  • ‘Africa Excites Our Imagination’: Netanyahu Offers 15 African Leaders Partnership

    Netanyahu offers 15 African leaders partnership By Dana Sanchez, 6:05 pm

    In a closed-door meeting at this week’s U.N. General Assembly, Netanyahu said he plans to visit West Africa later this year, “but I don’t intent to limit myself to East Africa or West Africa. Israel is looking at all of Africa,” he said. “And I hope that all of Africa looks at Israel.” Energyia Global Capital, a Jerusalem-based solar enterprise, launched East Africa’s first solar field in 2015 in Rwanda. The company is prepared to invest $2 billion in Africa over the next four years through Obama’s Power Africa program. The goal is clean electricity for 50 million people by 2020.

  • U.S.-Based Flower Firm Leaves Ethiopia After Protesters Attack Farm

    Africa's industrial powerhouse By Kevin Mwanza, 7:43 am

    Esmeralda Farms Nederland, a US-based flower farm in Bahir Dar, has ceased its operations in Ethiopia after an attack on its premises by alleged anti-government protestors that led to damages worth millions of dollars. The attack which was linked to the ongoing Oromia protests happened earlier in the month. It caused damages estimated at $ 11, 158, 900 (10 million euros), according to DutchNews.nl.

  • Will Chinese Farmers Reverse Consequences Of Indigenisation On Zimbabwe Tobacco Farms?

    Zimbabwe tobacco farms By Dana Sanchez, 12:04 pm

    The Chinese have entered many sectors of the economy under Zimbabwe’s Look East policy, but until recently avoided white-owned farms liberated by Mugabe. Chinese are now investing in tobacco production, growing it on formerly white-owned farms, and paying rent to landowners who were given farms seized by Zimbabwe’s ruling Zanu-PF. Mugabe’s disastrous land reforms caused agricultural production to nosedive. Now there are plenty of jobs in the tobacco-growing district, a worker said.

  • 8 Facts About Algeria’s Sugar Refinery King, Issad Rebrab

    By Julia Austin, 1:08 pm AFKI Original

    He was the country’s first billionaire and he got there through one of the most beloved and craved substances in the world — sugar. Rebrab, 72, says his success is abnormal and not entirely welcome in Algeria—a country with deep socialist tendencies for whom independence is relatively new. “Entrepreneurs are accepted, but not encouraged,” Rebrab said. He wants the government to encourage the private sector so it will invest in large projects and create jobs.

  • 8 Things You Should Know About Refugee-Turned-Billionaire Ashish Thakkar

    By Julia Austin, 4:05 pm AFKI Original

    Thakkar credits his success to being a refugee. He wants to get into farming and plans to invest in large-scale maize farming—something he says is a “no-brainer.” He also believes that for startups to succeed they must empower the country in which they are investing. Looking locally for everything from labor to investors rather than off-shoring is important to him. “Claiming that there is a skills deficit is nothing more than an excuse,” he said.

  • South Sudan Refugees In Uganda Sell Their Clothes To Buy Food

    By Kevin Mwanza, 6:44 am

    South Sudan refugees in Uganda are selling their clothes to raise money to buy food as a food rationing crisis bites due to influx of more refugees into the nation, which has strained World Food Program’s (WFP) food provision. The high influx of refugees have forced WFP and the Ugandan government to reduce food rations by nearly a half, driving most of the refugees to get means of supplementing the sorghum and beans rations they receive in the camps.

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