Agriculture: Latest News

  • Are Nigeria’s GMO Food Warnings A Precursor For A Potential Fine?

    GMO food warnings By Dana Sanchez, 4:17 pm

    Nigeria is threatening to shut down supermarkets selling genetically modified foods, and it has ordered South African grocery giant Shoprite and others to withdraw all GM food from their shelves until they get permits from the Nigerian government. “We are very serious about this,’’ a government spokesman said. Harmful effects of eating GM foods have been proved mostly without scientific basis. The potential harm from pesticides, however, is a different story. The same companies that make and sell GM plants make and sell chemicals to treat them.

  • YALI Alum’s Nest Egg Is In His Growing Poultry Business In Tanzania

    poultry business in Tanzania By Ann Brown, 9:47 am AFKI Original

    The African poultry sector is growing, especially in Tanzania. Eugene Paul Kavishe grew his poultry operation from 300 birds to 15,000 egg layers, thanks in part to U.S.-sponsored entrepreneur programs. Getting financing has been one of his biggest challenges. “Local financial institutions term agriculture as a very risky business,” he told AFKInsider. In 2014 he was chosen for Obama’s Young African Leaders Initiative. YALI offers African entrepreneurs a once-in-a-lifetime experience and a wealth of business knowledge, he said. “I hope that it will continue (in the next U.S. administration).”

  • 12 Reasons Why South Africa Will Avoid A Ratings Downgrade In December

    Avoiding A Ratings Downgrade By Peter Pedroncelli, 6:02 am AFKI Original

    Despite all of the issues plaguing South Africa at the moment, the country may manage to avoid a ratings downgrade in 2016. After surviving the potential downgrade of the country’s investment grade credit rating in June this year, the ratings agencies are set to pronounce judgement on South Africa once again in the coming months, and there is a risk that the country could be downgraded to below junk status. Here are 12 reasons why South Africa will avoid a ratings downgrade this December.

  • What A Post-Obama Administration May Mean For The African Growth And Opportunity Act

    By Staff, 12:12 am

    Trade deals criticized as harmful to U.S. economic interests have emerged as a key issue in the race for the White House. Trump could include AGOA as part of a general offensive against U.S. trade agreements. A threat to the program will more likely come from unfair competition on the part of the European Union. African regional trade blocs are in talks with the E.U. on deals that would allow E.U. goods to enter the continent duty-free.

  • More Bad News For South Africa: Tomato Leaf Miner Outbreak Reported

    tomato leaf miner By Dana Sanchez, 12:14 am

    A pest that earlier this year devastated the Nigerian tomato crop has been detected for the first time in South Africa after hitching a ride from South America to Europe, then spreading to Asia and Africa, Reuters reported. The tomato leaf miner, aka tuta absoluta, can ruin tomato and potato crops, the South African department of agriculture said on Friday. The outbreak was discovered on a tomato farm in eastern South Africa at a border post with neighboring Mozambique in the Kruger National Park.

  • Under The Radar: Foreign Investors Under Attack In Ethiopia

    Bubble In African Private Equity By Global Risk Insights, 7:05 am

    Mounting violence in Ethiopia has seen over 500 killed, as protests against the government’s economic and human rights policies continues. The tensions at the heart of the crisis are systemic ones, yet what makes the violence particularly worrisome is that foreign investors have become prominent targets. Foreign businesses are being systematically attacked in protest of the government’s development-centric approach

  • Could African Agriculture Leapfrog Harmful Pesticides By Using Plant Microbiomes?

    plant microbiomes By Dana Sanchez, 8:48 am

    Microbial solutions for pesticides and fertilizer are revolutionizing Western agriculture, but are slow getting started in Africa. There’s an overwhelming need to improve soil health and crop productivity on the continent. Yields have been stagnant for decades for several staple food crops. The bacteria living in roots, leaves and soil that help plants absorb nutrients, fight disease, and resist drought are less toxic than chemical ones, and potentially more efficient for farmers.

  • Ethiopian Protests Cause Spike In Price Of Beans And Vegetables In Netherlands

    economic impact of Ethiopian response to protests By Staff, 7:22 am

    Dutch suppliers have halted imports and production at their Ethiopian operations after anti-government protesters damaged their facilities. Prices have spiked in the Netherlands for products such as fine beans and exotic vegetables due to the disruption in supply from Ethiopia, with Kenya and Zimbabwe helping to fill the immediate sourcing gap.

  • How Ancient West African Cannabis Culture Inspires Blacks In US Marijuana Business

    Marijuana Business By Dana Sanchez, 2:09 pm

    Blacks are getting squeezed out of the marijuana business all over the U.S., says Ron Jones, founder of Sons of Hemp. The organization gets its name from the Bena Riamba or “Sons of Hemp” who lived in equatorial West Africa in the 1800s. The Bashilenge tribe worshiped hemp and formed a religion around it. Although U.S. minorities use marijuana at about the same rate as whites, they get arrested and go to jail for it more often. Sons of Hemp sued Detroit and now it plans a cannabis school to help nurture cannabis startups.

  • Why Is A Former Zimbabwean Vice President Offering Personal Restitution To A White Farmer?

    restitution to a white farmer By Dana Sanchez, 11:10 am

    Ousted Vice President Joice Mujuru agreed to pay $1.4M in personal funds to a white farmer whose land was taken by her late husband. Some analysts say this will inspire investor confidence in Zimbabwe and demonstrate respect for property rights. The ruling Zanu-PF party will do its best to discredit Mujuru as a traitor. “People should not be fooled by Mujuru’s gesture,” an analyst said. “Mujuru was a member of Zanu PF most of her life and she now wants to rebrand herself as (its) acceptable face.”

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