Agriculture: Latest News

  • South Africa’s First Black Female Winemaker Launches Her Own Brand

    first black female winemaker By Dana Sanchez, 9:34 am

    There are just 37 black-owned wine brands in South Africa, the world’s seventh-largest wine producing country. The industry employs 290,000 people at 550-plus wineries. Empowerment and transformation has been slow to increase black ownership and leadership. Ntsiki Biyela, South Africa’s first black female winemaker, is a role model and symbol of change. She recently launched her own brand, Aslina wines, named after her grandmother in a rural KwaZulu-Natal village of 1,000 people. The wines are set for export to the U.S. later this year.

  • The Anglos Are Coming To Francophone Africa With An Appetite For Investment

    Anglos investing in Francophone Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 10:13 am AFKI Original

    The Anglos have an apparently insatiable investment appetite for the region. Gabon will no longer fly under the radar after Washington, D.C.-based Carlyle Group — the world’s largest private equity fund — purchased Royal Dutch Shell’s onshore assets in Gabon for $587 million. Petroleum services, infrastructure and timber are rising on the radar for crafty investors in Gabon. Financial services and ICT too. Gabon is a stable provider of services and networks to neighboring countries. Here are six other Francophone African countries investors are looking at.

  • Wealth Opportunity Walks On 4 Legs In Africa: Top Countries For Livestock Investment

    top countries for livestock investment in Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 5:44 pm AFKI Original

    Africans are demanding more meat in their diets, but consumption may be limited because there are not enough commercial livestock owners producing affordable food. Firms are gobbling up arable land, not just for crop production but also for livestock and cattle. Investment shops are slowly redirecting capital to this subsector of agriculture. Nigeria is in tough times, but people still have to eat. About 45% of rural households own livestock, and meat consumption is strongly correlated to livestock ownership in Nigeria. Fewer than 10 percent of livestock owners function as a business. Most are just supporting the household livelihood.

  • Youthful Entrepreneur Uses Green Waste Recovery To Fight Malaria In Madagascar

    green waste recovery to fight malaria By Ann Brown, 1:04 pm AFKI Original

    When a coup in Madagascar sent her father into bankruptcy, 24-year-old Hanta Tiana Ranaivo Rajaonarisoa was forced to abandon her business administration studies in the U.S. She took over the family’s unused essential oil-making machine, and now supplies insect repellants to 40 pharmacies in Madagascar. Malaria is one of the country’s top 5 causes of death. Rajaonarisoa says she’s helping protect Madagascar’s amazing biodiversity — up to 90 percent of the country’s plant species are endemic — by using green waste recovery in her products.

  • 12 Crowdfunding Success Stories That Have Emerged From Africa

    Crowdfunding Success Stories By Peter Pedroncelli, 11:22 am AFKI Original

    The idea of funding a venture by raising money through many small contributions on the internet strikes a chord among Africans. It’s ubuntu at its finest. When Media 24 closed Ideas magazine in South Africa in 2016, former editor Terena le Roux took it upon herself to resurrect the publication. Thanks to support on social media, she launched a crowdfunding campaign via Thundafund. The money continues to come in, and she was able to relaunch the magazine.

  • Meet The Woman Considered An Architect Of The African Growth And Opportunity Act

    By Staff, 1:01 am

    The U.S. did not have a trade policy for Africa when Rosa Whitaker went to work for the U.S. State Department. U.S. policy was to view Africa as a charity case. Whitaker helped draft AGOA, the law gives duty-free access to the U.S. for African countries meeting eligibility requirements on human rights, rule of law and labor standards. With AGOA, the whole narrative changed, Whitaker said. “We no longer saw Africa as benefactors of charity. We were able to substitute paternalism with partnership.” The U.S. had trade representatives for every other region of the world except Africa. President Bill Clinton did not wait for AGOA to be passed before appointing Whitaker assistant trade representative for Africa.

  • World Bank Paying Ethiopia $68M For Carbon Trading, Green Business Development

    carbon trading By Mongabay, 1:34 pm

    Ethiopia has failed to make the most of emission reduction projects that allow developing countries to sell certified carbon credits, a stakeholder said. Making carbon credits marketable requires time, substantial investment and resources. Even then, a prospective buyer might reject them. Proponents say the carbon trading projects can’t come soon enough. The country is losing five times more forest than it’s planting. If Ethiopia is strategic, it can sell abundant resources like water to help power industrialization, boost tourism, boost electricity generation and create a wealthy green economy. And it’s renewable.

  • Low Corporate Tax Rate Beckons Investors To Under-The-Radar Mauritania

    low corporate tax rate Mauritania By Kurt Davis Jr., 10:24 am AFKI Original

    Mauritania requires no royalty payments, which is not the norm. This is a benefit for oil, gas and mining explorers anxious about paying royalties when commodity prices are unpredictable. Mauritania’s corporate income tax rate is relatively low at 25% — a plus in a region where the tax and fiscal systems can change any investor’s outlook on risk and reward. Large government irrigation projects have aided agricultural production in the desert. Israeli technology and cropping strategies have had some success in other parts of Africa. There is potential here, but it requires investment in technology — not always a priority in agriculture.

  • 11 African Countries Doing Field Tests For Genetically Modified Crops

    genetically modified crops By Dana Sanchez, 11:52 am AFKI Original

    Africa has been reluctant to adopt GM food technology for crop production, but that’s changing. Many African countries are willing to overcome domestic and international opposition to GM technology to boost their agriculture sector. Just four African countries allow GMO crops for cotton. In Africa, only South Africa grows GM food. Opponents urge African countries not to commercialize GM crops, saying it will put their agricultural sector in the hands of large multinational agri-businesses and hurt biodiversity. Proponents say GM crops are as safe.

  • One Of The Biggest Misconceptions About Equatorial Guinea: No Infrastructure

    misconceptions about Equatorial Guinea By Kurt Davis Jr., 10:34 pm AFKI Original

    Equatorial Guinea is not the easiest place to get to, or the easiest place to understand. Sub-Saharan Africa’s third-largest oil producer is aggressively spending oil revenue on building roads, schools, hospitals and housing. First-time visitors to this closed, mysterious country will encounter easily navigated highways. The government is constructing Oyala, a planned city deep in the rainforest, to possibly replace Malabo as the capital. Oyala will feature new government buildings, a university, five-star hotels and conference centers. Kempinski, one of Europe’s oldest luxury hotel groups, plans to operate the first Oyala hotel and golf resort.

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