Agriculture: Latest News

  • 7 Biotech, Health And Agro-Processing Projects Receive Cape Craft And Design Institute Funding

    Cape winelands Cape Craft And Design Institute By Peter Pedroncelli, 4:30 am

    Seven South African biotech, health, agro-processing, and manufacturing projects have received a funding boost from the Cape Craft and Design Institute (CCDI) through their Design Innovation Seed Fund (DISF) initiative. The grants, which form part of the Cape Craft and Design Institute’s second round of seed funding, will allow for the innovative projects to be developed for use in a variety of sectors that will benefit from the ideas in development.

  • 6 Women Tech Entrepreneurs Featuring At The World Economic Forum On Africa

    Six Women Tech Entrepreneurs Featuring At The World Economic Forum On Africa By Peter Pedroncelli, 3:49 am

    The annual World Economic Forum on Africa will see a selection of impressive women tech entrepreneurs taking center stage in Durban, South Africa, with the aim of showcasing the wealth of entrepreneurial talent available on the continent. The 2017 meeting runs from Wednesday, May 3 to Friday, May 5, and will be conducted with the wider theme of “Achieving inclusive growth through responsive and responsible leadership” in mind. Women continue to be an important driver of African economies, with one-third of all businesses across Africa owned by women.

  • French Offers Support For Ghana’s Tech Startup Ecosystem

    By Staff, 8:52 am

    Paris & Co, the economic development and innovation agency of Paris, and Meltwater Entrepreneurial School of Technology (MEST) signed an MoU (memorandum of understanding ), underpinning France’s recognition of Ghana’s potential in new technologies and its support of the West African country’s startup ecosystem. A statement by the French Embassy in Ghana says the African […]

  • Private Equity Is Not Dead, But Maybe It’s Time For More Hedge Funds In Africa

    Hedge Funds In Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 2:00 am AFKI Original

    Short-term volatility and uncertainty in the African growth story create opportunities for hedge funds. Hedge funds generally operate more flexibly than private equity, and they have the creativity to generate bond-like returns that outpace inflation. Critics say hedge funds have limited liquidity in an opaque world. The riskiest play — but with big returns — is in agriculture and land. Where land is for sale in Africa, investors are making a play for a limited resource, especially when it’s arable, ripe for production or ideal for commercial and residential construction.

  • AGOA: Just 1 Reason Why China Loves Manufacturing In Ethiopia

    why China loves manufacturing in Ethiopia By Staff, 1:00 am

    By moving manufacturing to Ethiopia, Chinese textile companies are moving closer to their raw material base, the cotton-producing countries. This is part of their value chain repositioning, a strategy most Chinese companies are adopting. They’re are also using Africa as a gateway to emerging markets on and off the continent. Products made in Ethiopia can be exported duty- and quota free to the U.S. under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). The same benefits apply to the E.U. Ethiopia also offers cheap electricity at US$0.04 cents per kilowatt hour. It’s now the second-largest electricity producer in sub-Sahara due to its hydropower dams.

  • 2016 Was A Bad Year For Private Equity In Africa. Commodities Prices Could Turn That Around

    bad year for private equity in Africa By Staff, 12:01 am

    The fall in African private equity investment in 2016 could be a short-term blip. Among the losers was US-based Carlyle, one of the world’s winningest investment firms. Carlyle invested $147m in Nigeria’s Diamond Bank in 2014. The bank’s market cap fell by 90% over the subsequent two years. Bob Geldof’s PE firm 8 Miles just invested in Blue Skies, a British fruit firm that operates in Africa. Utilities including telecoms were the most popular target for private equity investment in 2016. West Africa was the most active region.

  • Tapping Into Local Tradition: How AB InBev Hopes To Crack Africa’s Home-Brew Market

    InBev hopes to crack Africa's home-brew market By Reuters, 1:00 am

    Africa’s informal alcohol market is about four times bigger than its $11 billion commercial market, analysts say. Home brews have a strong tradition rooted in centuries-old African rituals. AB InBev needs to develop products affordable enough to tap the informal beer and alcohol markets, says InBev’s new Africa head. AB Inbev’s big rivals in Africa – Heineken and Diageo – have also launched lower-priced drinks made with local ingredients that are affordable for more people.

  • East Africa Is The Manufacturing Star In Sub-Saharan Africa In 2017

    manufacturing star in sub-Saharan Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 9:54 am AFKI Original

    As commodity prices have fallen, African manufacturing has increased leverage — and the attention of investors — to garner more foreign investment. Tanzania is probably one of the easier bets if you are following the crowd. Success stories include Kenya-based Catalyst Principal Partners, an East Africa-focused private equity firm which invested in Zenufa Laboratories, a leading Tanzanian pharmaceuticals manufacturer. Catalyst also invested in Chemi Cotex, which makes toothpaste, skin and hair products. Both involve non-food and beverage consumer goods that are manufactured locally. Both have taken market share due to quality products and competitive pricing.

  • South Africa’s First Black Female Winemaker Launches Her Own Brand

    first black female winemaker By Dana Sanchez, 9:34 am

    There are just 37 black-owned wine brands in South Africa, the world’s seventh-largest wine producing country. The industry employs 290,000 people at 550-plus wineries. Empowerment and transformation has been slow to increase black ownership and leadership. Ntsiki Biyela, South Africa’s first black female winemaker, is a role model and symbol of change. She recently launched her own brand, Aslina wines, named after her grandmother in a rural KwaZulu-Natal village of 1,000 people. The wines are set for export to the U.S. later this year.

  • The Anglos Are Coming To Francophone Africa With An Appetite For Investment

    Anglos investing in Francophone Africa By Kurt Davis Jr., 10:13 am AFKI Original

    The Anglos have an apparently insatiable investment appetite for the region. Gabon will no longer fly under the radar after Washington, D.C.-based Carlyle Group — the world’s largest private equity fund — purchased Royal Dutch Shell’s onshore assets in Gabon for $587 million. Petroleum services, infrastructure and timber are rising on the radar for crafty investors in Gabon. Financial services and ICT too. Gabon is a stable provider of services and networks to neighboring countries. Here are six other Francophone African countries investors are looking at.

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