10 French-African Fusion Recipes To Die For

By Julia Austin AFKI Original Published: April 24, 2014, 2:49 am
beninese ragoutbeninese ragout

Africa has about 20 countries that are French speaking, so naturally it’s a great place to find some amazing French-fusion cuisine. Here are some French-African recipes that blend the flavors of France and Africa in creative, mouth-watering ways.

closetcooking.com

closetcooking.com

 

Chicken Tagine with Olives and Citron Confit

Tagine is a very common North African style of cooking, with food traditionally made in beautiful, pyramid-shaped, ceramic tagines which marries flavors really well. In this dish, the salty warm olives are delicious against the bright, sweet citrus and the popular African spices like turmeric and coriander mix well in the French confit.

Source: CookingChannelTv.com

foodnetwork.ca

foodnetwork.ca

Salt Cod Beignets

This recipe takes two foods that are representative of African and French cuisine and combines in them in a surprising way. Salted fish is often found in African entrees and snacks, and the sweet beignet can be found at French pasty shops everywhere. The flaky, warm and semi-sweet beignet tempers the salty cod perfectly. These make for a great appetizer.

Source: CookingChannelTv.com

dirtykitchensecrets.com

dirtykitchensecrets.com

 

Minty Couscous

Even though couscous is traditionally a Moroccan dish, it’s popular in French cuisine, especially when eaten cold as a summer salad. The mint in this simple recipe lends itself perfectly to a couscous salad, so try serving this chilled!

Source: CookingChannelTv.com

dr-soup.com

dr-soup.com


Traditional Senegalese Soup

Senegal has a very strong French influence in its culinary scene and has long been a French-speaking territory so traditional Senegalese food, like this soup, often seems distinctly French. This tangy soup has African fruits like mango for a sweet flavor, with French cuisine elements such as heavy cream, flour for thickening and butter.

Source: Food.com

thewanderlustkitchen.com

thewanderlustkitchen.com

 

Senegalese Poulet Yassa

This hearty chicken recipe has some trademark French ingredients like Dijon mustard and bouillon, but gets a lot of its flavor from traditional Senegalese ingredients such as chili pepper flakes, coarse black pepper and lemon juice, making a zesty and spicy dish.

Source: Food.com

beninese ragout

beninese ragout

Beninese Ragout

Ragout is a staple of most French restaurant menus and is traditionally made with eggplant, bell peppers and tomatoes, but in this Beninese rendition you’ll find sweet yams, soup bones and chili paste for a flavor that’s rich, spicy and a little sweet.

Source: Celtnet.org.uk

bonne.tortore.over-blog.fr

bonne.tortore.over-blog.fr

Boeuf aux Chocolate Gabonnaise (Beef with Gabon Chocolate)

Making chocolate sauces for meat dishes is a signature trait of French cuisine. This recipe calls for Gabon chocolate, which is ground up and heated with mango kernels so the chocolate becomes less dense and rich. Red palm oil lightens up the chocolate a little more, and the cayenne pepper, onions and crawfish give a nice salty flavor to the otherwise heavy dish.

 

Source: Celtnet.org.uk

simplyrecipes.com

simplyrecipes.com

Rabbit Sauce

Rabbit is a very popular meat in French cuisine, but Gabonese chefs make some of the greatest rabbit sauce. Blending peanut butter, garlic, tomato puree and Maggi chicken cube, this is a complex, sweet-and-salty sauce that tastes great over any meat.

 

Source: Celtnet.org.uk

sugarandcinnamon.com

sugarandcinnamon.com

 

Caramelized Banana and Mango Tart

French pastry shops are full of little fruit tarts on flaky, nutty, vanilla crusts with light custards and fresh fruit. The caramelized banana and mango tart is a traditional dessert from Guinea, but we love this recipe that puts a little twist on the original recipe by adding coconut, giving it a tropical flavor.

Source: SugarandCinnamon.com

telegraph.co.uk

telegraph.co.uk

Guinea fowl and chanterelles

The guinea fowl is, naturally, a popular type of poultry in Guinean cuisine, and the chanterelles are fragrant, nutty and rich mushrooms that French chefs love to work with. Combine the two and you get a dish bursting with flavor.

Source: ChefTalk.com

 

 

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